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LOGISTICS


FEATURE SPONSOR


The game changing Umoe Firmus (left) is managed by Tidal Transit and image credit to CHPV


AN EXCITING TIME TO BE IN EAST ANGLIA


“East Anglia is universally recognised as being the hub of the UK energy industry and the phenomenal growth of renewable energy and in particular offshore wind, makes it a very exciting place from which to be based,” says Leo Hambro, Commercial Director of Tidal Transit


Located on the North Norfolk coast, the company is one of the UK’s leading vessel charter businesses providing specialist crew transfer vessels [CTVs] to offshore wind farm developers and operators. It has recently won two further charter contracts at Innogy’s Gwynt y Mor wind farm, situated off the coast of North wales, which could keep its vessels working there into the 2020s.


FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH


Since investing in its first vessel in 2011, the company has gone from strength to strength and now has a staff of 42 people, four CTVs and manages the game changing WaveCraft Surface Effect Ship, Umoe Firmus. Leo continued: “There is so much happening in the waters off the East


Anglia coast; four offshore windfarms are in their Operations & Maintenance [O&M] phase, and the Dudgeon Offshore Wind Farm is scheduled to be fully operational later this year. These power plants all need rugged vessels to support their planned maintenance programmes and to rectify unexpected equipment failures.”


SATISFYING A RISING DEMAND


While 2016 saw vessel supply outstrip demand in the UK offshore wind marketplace, activity in 2017 is already seeing some suppliers juggling vessel availability as they seek to satisfy a rising demand.


In East Anglia this demand is being led by the Race Bank, Galloper, Dudgeon and East Anglia One offshore windfarm construction programmes and as these projects move towards their O&M phases it is anticipated that the huge Dogger Bank, Hornsea 1 & 3, Triton Knoll, Norfolk Vanguard and Boreas Round 3 developments will be underway.


FURTHER OFFSHORE


As these Round 3 projects are all much further offshore than any of the windfarms so far constructed, Leo Hambro believes there are some major challenges ahead and continued: “Although the continued growth of the offshore wind energy sector over the coming years is almost guaranteed, my colleagues and I are very interested to see the vessel support requirements specified by the individual developers to facilitate the construction and operational of these massive East Anglian projects.”


SINCE INVESTING IN ITS


FIRST VESSEL IN 2011, THE COMPANY HAS GONE FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH


Leo concluded: “I believe those requirements could create a need to establish strategic partnerships and alliances within the vessel supply chain to ensure that East Anglian businesses can provide the appropriate marine support packages.”


Tidal Transit


48


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


SPOTLIGHT ON EAST OF ENGLAND


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