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FEATURE SPONSOR


REAL TIME DATA


Figure 5: Shows the system trending with increases 4 different intervals for stress applied to the rig shaft


Figure 6: Shows the system trending with increases 4 different intervals for stress applied to the rig shaft SENSOR CAPABILITY


Within this development project Turner would offer…


• Wear metal debris monitoring • Oil condition monitoring • Vibration monitoring • Gearbox oil temperature monitoring


CASE STUDY: STRATHCLYDE UNIVERSITY


An M-HAS system has been installed on a test machine at Strathclyde University in Glasgow. The rig has been fitted with oil condition, wear metal measurement and vibration sensors (figs 2 & 3).


M-HAS SYSTEM MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL


The system communicates real time with the instrumentation and through acquiring data determines a run time performance baseline. As the machine deviates from these measurements the system responds. This can be as simple as an alert to inform personnel or to control and shut down the machine. The M-HAS user would set up these in the cloud based system user set up section. The test rig allows torque to be applied to the shaft and stress the gearbox. The arm for applying can be seen in figure 4.


A hydraulic arm can be controlled to apply torque to the shaft. This causes an increase in vibration and particulate in the oil is generated. M-HAS measures these parameters in real time and informs the operator. The system can also measure the effects of the stress applied and shut the machine down if/as required. Examples of the trend for 3 vibration probes generating alarms are shown in figure 5.


Figure 7: shows that when the oil temperature is overlaid on the timeline a significant increase occurs


The vibration transducer for monitoring the shaft where the torque is applied showing significant increase and alarming immediately to this. The application of torque also creates


an increase in particulate within the system lubricant. This creates a second alarm to the operator. Figure 6 shows this happening at the same time as the vibration increases and in real time. Finally figure 7 shows that when the oil temperature is overlaid on the timeline a significant increase occurs. M-HAS could be set up to look at


different levels of response to different parameter increases and prioritise the response based on either individual parameters or based on the combined sensor values.


CONCLUSION


The M-HAS system clearly measures critical parameters and in real time. The system analyses the data and applies predefined data rules set up by the user. The system will then respond in real time to the measurements and any changes to normal performance and outwith permissible tolerance limits. The system response can be as simple informing key personnel or be set up to control the machine under test.


Turner Wind Services SCAN/CLICK


SCAN/CLICK


MORE INFO


BROCHURE


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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