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SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE


“Customers will be able to use Live Chat to get advice”


Jeremy Jenkins, MD, SportsArt UK


“Service is one of the major reasons customers choose SportsArt. They can take delivery of equipment on the basis that, should any replacement parts be required, they’ll be delivered within 24 hours, and if an engineer needs to fit them, they’ll arrive within the following 24 hours. “Our new warehouse has spare


parts for every piece of equipment, so they can be shipped within hours of a client needing them. Most importantly, we’ve developed the SportsArt Customer Service Portal, which will shortly be launched on the UK website. The portal allows customers to order parts, book an engineer and use Live Chat to get advice.”


“Service


performance data is particularly valuable”


Margaret Vane, UK service manager, Life Fitness UK


“A poor experience can come at any stage within a process, so at Life Fitness we monitor all of our internal and field-based staff, the way in which they perform their roles and our overall service operating procedures. “We’ve found that using service


performance data in a more investigative manner has been particularly valuable, as it helps to highlight underlying factors that may exist within a customer’s own operating procedures. We’re then able to discuss these and work with customers to help ensure these issues can be minimised. This may involve offering simple documents for staff to use, setting up temporary courtesy visit schedules or giving additional maintenance instructions.”


“USBs have the


potential to break, so we’ve used


wireless technology”


Alastair Watson, vice president Europe, Keiser


“We’re constantly testing and updating so our equipment continues to be highly durable and maintenance- free. Most indoor cycles are designed to last around three years, but our M3 Bike easily surpasses that average by years. “A big challenge facing clubs is the


ability for them and their customers to download information, so with the new M3i, which launched earlier this year, we looked at a number of routes. That included USBs, but we discounted them because of breakage potential. The M3i is the first group-ex cycle with a Bluetooth wireless display, so it can be ‘partnered’ wirelessly with either a phone or tablet.”


84 Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


Howard Swinyard, network and services director, Technogym UK


“With customers increasingly looking to keep their assets for longer, service and maintenance and cost of ownership are bigger priorities than before. Service providers that can offer efficiency and dependability, as well as in-depth product knowledge, have the advantage. “Recognising this, Technogym


underpins all its service contracts with agreements that promise best- in-class time to service and first-time fix rate. We also invest heavily in product development to increase product reliability and durability. “Clients can phone, email or book


services round the clock through TG Direct, our online customer portal.” ●


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


“Equipment will break down, so it comes down to the speed of response. Our first-time fix rate is regularly at 95 per cent and our standard call-out time is just over 24 hours – well below the average of 48 hours in the UK. Our engineers have a critical parts list and appropriate spares on the van. “The more problems


you can fix first time, the more engineers you have to respond to other calls. “Equipment quality is also vital.


Take something like the bracket the pedals are attached to – a common thing to break. We produce 60,000 bikes a year and


we haven’t had a single breakage to that part on any of them. If you get the quality right, then it frees up your engineers.”


“Companies that


offer efficiency and dependability have the advantage”


“The more problems you fix first time, the more engineers you have to respond to other calls”


John Gamble, managing director of EMEA, Star Trac


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