This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Research shows a link between frequent staff


interaction and making friends at the club


About TRP 10,000™


• Half of members had been a member for at least 12


• Average age 41 (16 to 85 years) • 56 per cent female


• First ever club for 25 per cent


months, 25 per cent less than six months and 25 per cent more than three years


• 67 per cent of members used their club less than twice a week


• 24 per cent had been a member of the current club before


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


TRP 10,000™ is the biggest and most comprehensive survey of member behaviour ever carried out in the health and fitness industry: 10,000 health and fitness members completed a baseline survey of their exercise habits and membership behaviour between July and September 2013. During regular intervals over the coming years, they will be followed up to measure changes to their habits and membership behaviour. The respondent profi le was:


C


onducted in partnership with The Retention People,


W


e already know that members’ progress towards their goals is an important determinant


of retention (see part three of this series, HCM July 14, p48). For each goal that members reported making progress on, their risk of cancelling in the next month fell by approximately 10 per cent. We’ve also highlighted the benefi cial


effects of fi tness staff interaction on membership retention (see HCM Sept 14, p42): even when members experience hassles in their clubs that increase the risk of them cancelling, the risk can be reduced if fi tness staff regularly talk to members. In this month’s article, we’ll look


at the combination of fi tness staff interaction, member progress and subsequent retention.


Data and analysis Members were asked how much progress they had made in the last three months against a list of 10 possible goals, including losing weight, feeling fitter and making new friends. The number of goals members said


they had progressed on were summed to make a score between 0 and 10.


“Fewer than one in 10 members who report no staff interaction


say they have made a lot of progress, versus more than half of


those who are spoken to on each visit”


The scores were then classifi ed as high or low progress, with the high category representing the top 25 per cent of members’ scores. Members were also asked how


frequently fi tness staff spoke to them by ticking one box: always, frequently, occasionally, or never.


Member-staff interaction So how often do staff speak to members, and who do they speak to most? Figure 1 (see p56) shows that, overall,


over a quarter of members say fi tness staff never speak to them, and over 60 per cent say they speak to them less than frequently. Females are more likely to be spoken to than males.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 55


PHOTO: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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