This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY


The Muse meditative headband rests lightly on the ears, rather like a pair of sunglasses


THE MUSE HEADBAND The device is priced from US$359 APPLE WATCH


Apple debuted its long-awaited smartwatch offering in September, featuring a host of health and fi tness-related functions. Due to ship in early 2015, the


Apple Watch features photo- sensitive sensors to record pulse information, while connectivity with an iPhone allows for wifi and GPS usage to track movement, pace and distance travelled. An accelerometer measures total body movement, as well as the quality and intensity of movements made. The Watch includes two specifi c


health and fi tness apps: Fitness and Workout. The Fitness app tracks all types of activity goals, with a series of visual ‘rings’ signifying daily progress. Workout facilitates fi tness plans and displays workout metrics in real time on the watch. With so many apps tracking


aspects of wellbeing, Apple has also moved to unify the fragmented market by launching its Healthkit platform (compatible with the watch) that pulls in data from third- party health apps and presents the data in one manageable dashboard.


The Muse headband by wearable tech start-up InteraXon helps people meditate, and is marketed as a product to help manage stress. It reads and measures the user’s brainwaves to paint a picture of how brain activity is affected by emotions. It also comes with an integrated brain


health application that teaches meditation. The device rests on


the ears like a pair of sunglasses and teaches users how to calm their brain via computer-guided meditation, in the form of cranial training app Calm. The benefi ts of decreasing brainwave rhythm using meditative techniques


GOOGLE GLASS / SMART LENS


In addition to its Glass product – which functions like a hands- free smartphone, with information displayed in the user’s sight line – Google is developing smart contact lenses. Announced in January,


the lenses look set to be able to monitor blood sugar levels via an antenna smaller than a strand of human hair. This will open up new methods of self- management for chronic diseases such as diabetes, as well as tracking uses applicable to fi tness. With a camera


potentially being used The lenses could have virtual reality applications


in the lenses, people’s vision could be corrected much like the auto-focus on a camera. This could create new interactive opportunities for the visually impaired in terms of sport participation and


health and fi tness, as well as VR applications. Google is partnering


with pharmaceutical company Novartis to take the project forward, aiming to come up with a prototype in 2015.


include the production of endorphins and dopamine, better memory, attentiveness and empathy, according to InteraXon. The device uses a


rechargeable battery and is compatible with iOS, Mac and select PC operating systems, retailing at approximately US$299.


LECHAL TRAINERS


While much wearable technology has so far focused on wristwear, a company from India wants to get to the heart and sole of fi tness tracking through its Lechal wearable tech trainers. Ducere is currently taking pre-


orders with a view to a late 2014 release for its interactive haptic feedback footwear. The shoes are built with bluetooth-enabled insoles (which can also be bought separately)


62


The shoes have bluetooth- enabled insoles that connect to a smartphone


that connect to a smartphone and provide user feedback through insole vibrations. They can be connected to Google Maps, enabling directions to be


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


disseminated without the need to look at a screen – handy for running in busy streets – while the usual pedometer/ calorie counter is also present. The company has indicated the


insole will be priced at US$100, with the cost of the shoes likely to be similar. The creators were initially developing a shoe designed for the visually impaired, before realising the concept had broader applications. ●


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100