This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY


WEARING IT WELL


Jak Phillips rounds up some of the latest innovations in health and fi tness wearables – a market that’s expected to be worth US$2bn by 2018


T


ech giants such as Apple and Google are pouring millions into what’s frequently dubbed ‘the next big


thing’, while the wearables market is also courting innovation from a host of exciting start-ups. The wearables market is expected to represent at least US$2bn in revenue globally by 2018, with health and fitness trackers currently representing around 61 per cent of the sector. The ramifi cations for health


and wellbeing are huge. Medical institutions are already using the technology to monitor patients’ vitals – aiming to identify problems early – and there’s potential for spas and health clubs to monitor customer biometrics as well.


Wearables are infi ltrating


corporate wellness programmes too, as US employers harness information from health trackers to determine employees’ health insurance premiums. And many feel this is just the start for wearable tech, which has the potential for seamless integration with the Internet of Things – the advanced connectivity of devices, systems and services – as it gains momentum. We look at the latest innovations


in health and fi tness wearables, to assess which ideas could leave rivals stuck in the starting blocks.


Jak Phillips is head of news at Leisure Media Email: jakphillips@ leisuremedia.com


Pavlok delivers a short, sharp shock to users who stray off plan


PAVLOK


Be it sleeping in or skipping the gym, everyone wishes they could kick those bad habits that hurt productivity and prevent physical activity. Now, a new wearable is bidding to not just track activity, but use pain and shame to ensure users have no choice but to reach their goals. Due for release in 2015, Pavlok is


a fi tness tracking wristband that also serves as a behavioural conditioner, with a pre-order price of US$149.99. Aside from the usual tracking of steps, activity and sleep, this wearable has the ability to give away your money, shame you on social media, or even deliver a 340v static shock if you slip back into bad habits. It also offers rewards – as yet unspecifi ed – as well as posting encouraging social media posts if you stay on the straight and narrow. Triallists have mainly been using the


device to help programme their body to wake up earlier and exercise more, although there’s clearly potential for such technology to be applied to diet control and smoking cessation as well.


RALPH LAUREN POLO TECH T-SHIRT


From 2015, tennis enthusiasts will be able to record metrics and data from recent performances to improve their game, thanks to a movement tracking shirt from fashion designer Ralph Lauren. The luxury brand’s


The T-shirt’s sensors can read heartbeat 60


Polo Tech T-shirt uses sensors knitted into the fabric to read heartbeat, respiration and other biometrics. Data collected by the shirt is stored by a ‘black box system’, which


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


also captures movement and direction metrics. These fi ndings, along


with data related to energy output and stress levels, are sent to the cloud and are viewable on a tablet or smartphone. Meanwhile, Sony is


preparing to launch its attachable Smart Tennis Sensor early next year. The US$200 device attaches to rackets to record up to 12,000 shots of swing and serve data.


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100