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“2025 will be a different world. Robots may be applied to things like cleaning, and possibly even equipment maintenance, which would make the cost of running clubs cheaper and hopefully drive down the cost for members”


T


echnology is a significant threat, but also a very real opportunity. The old adage has it that we


dramatically overestimate what impact technology will have over a two-year horizon, but dramatically underestimate the impact over a 10-year horizon. During the next two years, I think


we’ll see more of the same. Consumer technologies will continue to come into the club, and I’d like to see better integration with all the wearables. The Apple Watch will be a game changer in terms of awareness of health and activity levels, and I’d like to incorporate that into our plans and offering at GoodLife. However, 2025 will be a totally


different world: lots of people think that, by then, there will be more robots than cellphones and tablets. Robots may be applied to things like cleaning, and possibly even some equipment maintenance, potentially reducing these ongoing costs. This would make the cost of running clubs cheaper, and hopefully drive down the cost for the members.


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


For now, technology is focused


STE VE GROVES


GOODLIFE FITNESS: VP AND CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER


on the entertainment side, and here the industry is playing catch-up with consumer trends. In my opinion, the real opportunity lies in taking advantage of some of the technologies that are commonplace in the home, such as Xbox Kinect, and repurposing them for the industry. This is a relatively low-cost technology, but the cameras can detect how active individual muscles are during exercise, which could be of huge benefi t to personal trainers for example. As imaging technology advances, we


need to work out how to make the most of this opportunity, using it to supplement what PTs are doing already: helping clients visualise what the PT is explaining to them, for example, and at the same time allowing PTs to work with half a dozen clients at once. Heart rate monitors stitched


into clothing is another fascinating technology, which again presents opportunities for PTs to create more personalised exercise programmes.


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital 49


PHOTO: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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