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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2014 LETTERS C WRITE TO REPLY


Do you have a strong opinion or disagree with somebody else’s views on the industry? If so, we’d love to hear from you – email: healthclub@leisuremedia.com


Equipment availability is the primary value driver I read with great interest the recent retention article – Hassles and Uplifts – by Dr Melvyn Hillsdon (see HCM Sept 14, p42). Finally, a retention report which recognises that if customers have to queue for equipment in gyms, this is not only one of the most annoying hassles they face but also, if it happens frequently, significantly increases the likelihood of them cancelling their membership. However, I question the article’s


final conclusion: that staff talking to customers is still more important. I believe it’s important to


Gaining social and psychological support skills could benefit fitness workers


Creating a workforce able to handle modern day challenges


I was interested to read your recent news story reporting on the survey, conducted by ukactive and published by CYQ, which found that more than 55 per cent of UK fitness managers believe exercise professionals are under-skilled for delivering social and psychological support to inactive people. As part of an organisation committed


to ensuring our industry has a qualified, competent workforce, we’re looking forward to the challenge of ensuring our sector can deal with modern day issues. As recently as LIW, I’ve seen the


active approach employers are taking to reduce their skills gaps. I’m proud to say that SkillsActive, through its new Lead Provider offering, is right behind this. By acknowledging that bespoke skills are required from exercise professionals, we’re connecting employers directly with


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training providers who can meet their requirements. Through different learning platforms, exercise professionals can also access training that directly solves the shortages referenced in this report. But there’s an understanding that this is an ever-developing agenda, and the door is open to further discussion on how we can offer employers and the public fully trained, work-ready professionals. This report raises some interesting


debates concerning the requirements of exercise professionals and the structure of National Occupational Standards. We look forward to helping ensure our sector can meet the needs of health, fitness and exercise in 2015 and beyond.


Tom Bell Head of professional development, SkillsActive


Read Health Club Management online at healthclubmanagement.co.uk/digital


Frequently queueing for equipment raises members’ cancellation risk


November/December 2014 © Cybertrek 2014


understand what constitutes a primary value driver for customers; while secondary value drivers are important, if you remove the primary value driver the secondary drivers mean nothing. For gym floor customers, the primary value driver is using gym equipment: remove all the kit from a gym floor and your customers will leave, regardless of how friendly gym staff are. Remove all the gym staff and what happens? It’s been tried: it’s called a budget gym, and it’s the fastest growing sector of the UK gym industry.


Rory McGown Founder, GYMetrix


Nov/Dec 2014


August 2013


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PICTURE: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/DEBORAH KOLB


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