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COMPOSITES MACHINING


Innovative Tools for Machining Composite Materials Iscar Metals Inc. (Arlington, TX) has developed a new range of tools, both indexable and solid-carbide, for ma- chining composite materials. Because intensive abrasion of a cutting tool can lead to dramatic deterioration of cutting tool geometry and, as a result, to performance problems, Iscar R&D has focused on wear that can cause delamination during drilling and milling operations. In order to significantly improve the cutting tools’ performance during drilling, Iscar has developed a solution based on interchangeable heads of its SUMOCHAM product line. The new ICF drilling head geometry, which has been especially designed for drilling composite materials, provides low axial forces for smooth penetration during the cutting process without splintering phenomenon. The new heads are based on a new carbide submicron substrate and diamond coating for prolonged and predictable tool life.


SUMOCHAM for composites is suitable for use on any type of machine-tools such as CNC machines, robots,


and even powered feed machines (ADU) for which special thread connectors are available. The fast head replace- ment and high positioning repeatability provide minimum machine downtime. Relatively small indexable drilling heads with diamond coating provide an economic advantage, compared to long full solid-carbide drills, as well as easy stock management. The SUMOCHAM range for compos- ite materials covers today a diameter range from 0.250 to 0.500" (6.35–12.7 mm). Iscar also offers a range of solid-carbide drills, starting


from 0.118" (3 mm). The tool geometry of the CFD family has been designed with a stepped point and with two working sections, considerably improving surface finish and allowing a smooth cut on very difficult-to-machine composites, like RTM or thermoplastic materials.


For milling applications, the versatile Multi-Master tool system, with interchangeable heads, features a carbide head with brazed PCD tips. Due to this innovative design, a ma- chined composite workpiece experiences less loading and swarf evacuation issues and surface finish is improved. The main applications for these tools are orbital milling, edging, and ramping down. Another milling family, EPX, is intended mostly for machining carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). This family of compression end mills features opposite cutting edge directions—a combination of right and left helix along one flute. This progressive cutting edge geometry reduces delamination and improves tool performance when milling CFRP and the technology is especially recommended for increased feed rates. Iscar’s EPN-F family of solid-carbide end mills feature cut- ting edges that are divided into sections. This design results in better distribution of load on the end mill and machined workpiece, and thus provides increased tool life and im- proved surface finish, especially when machining carbon fiber and honeycomb composites.


? See us at Booth #E-5405 88 AdvancedManufacturing.org | September 2016


Iscar Metals Inc. 817-258-3200 /


Kennametal Inc. 724-539-5000 / www.kennametal.com


Precorp Inc. 801-798-4686 / www.precorp.net


Sandvik Coromant 201-794-5000 / www.sandvik.coromant.com/us


Seco Tools LLC 248-528-5200 / www.secotools.com/us


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