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Strengthening Communities


Building The Better Bank Material Issues How We Operate Responsible Banking Extraordinary Workplace Environmental Leadership Strengthening Communities


Community Investment Financial Education Affordable Housing Sourcing Tax Policy


Reporting


Financial Education


FS-13 WHY IT’S MATERIAL TO TD +


Financial literacy is an important life skill that’s more relevant than ever to the prosperity and well-being of our customers and society as a whole. The issue is directly related to our business as a financial institution. We therefore have the unique ability through our expertise, skills and relationships with millions of consumers to support financial education and help build a financially literate society.


HEADLINE PERFORMANCE $12+ million


invested by TD since 2010 in community financial literacy initiatives across North America.


MANAGEMENT APPROACH


Our goal is to help people develop the knowledge, skills and confidence to make better financial decisions and improve their lives. To achieve that, we take a two-fold approach:


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Customers – TD helps customers take control of their finances in many ways. Learn more in the Responsible Banking section of this report.


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Communities – Our community financial literacy strategy is to collaborate with non-profits to raise financial literacy levels in our society, with a focus on underserved or disadvantaged communities (low-income, youth, Aboriginal peoples and newcomers to Canada).


This past year we formed the TD North American Financial Education Council to better align financial literacy activities across TD, and further embed financial education in the bank’s overall approach to product development, community activities and engagement with employees and the public.


Targets 2014 Targets


Help 150,000 participants improve financial literacy through a TD-sponsored program.


n FS-16 2014 PERFORMANCE


In 2014, TD invested over $3.1 million to support community financial literacy programs across North America and the U.K. In addition, more than 1,800 TD volunteers around the world taught money skills in classrooms and community centres.


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Launched in 2011, Money Matters is a free financial literacy program for adult learners, developed by ABC Life Literacy Canada and TD, with TD employees as volunteer tutors. In 2014, we committed an additional $450,000 to support the program, which is generating great results: since inception, 89% of Money Matters participants have felt more able to manage their money to meet their needs. More than 300 TD employees have volunteered over 2,500 hours teaching close to 3,000 Canadian adults.


For more than 17 years, TD has been instrumental in supporting the ongoing development and delivery of Junior Achievement (JA) Canada’s programs. In October 2014, we extended our support by donating $1 million to JA’s programs, including Dollars with Sense. As part of this donation, more than 1,200 TD employees will volunteer their time to deliver 800 programs reaching more than 23,000 youth over three years.


n Rating 2014 Results Met


Over 294,000 people reached across North America and U.K.


2015 Targets 200,000 participants


We renewed our partnership with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC), sponsoring 110 adult financial education seminars for approximately 2,000 people in Florida, New York City, Philadelphia, North Carolina and South Carolina. NFCC member agencies, with assistant instructors from TD Bank, taught the free seminars, which focused on budgeting, understanding credit reports and scores, and preparing for home ownership.


TD 2014 Corporate Responsibility Report Page 51





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