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044 MEDIA ARCHITECTURE / OPINION


elements could have a wayfinding function and guide people through the night. Scenario 2 – high resolution media architec- ture: Possible high resolution scenarios can consist of thousands of full colour RGB LED pixels, integrated into the exterior or inte- rior building volume, communicating with the user via interaction and sensor technol- ogy in combination with fulfilling functional lighting of the building.


These two examples demonstrate the great range of possibilities in implementing a media layer into architecture. However, it is extremely important that this is driven by a holistic concept and the artistic, contempo- rary design approach.


As lighting designers we need to see it as our mission to ‘create meaningful islands of light’ that invite people to slow down and to enjoy the luminous experience. Media architecture is an amazing dynamic feature


that attracts people and can be used to cre- ate unique spaces.


In an increasingly ‘mediatised’ and commer- cialised global society, visual arts, media and architecture act as interdisciplinary domains. I am noticing an increasing fusion between the arts, media and the public but also private space.


The design of media architecture can be seen as process intersecting architecture, art, moving images and digital installation to one holistic spatial artwork. All in all, media architecture is a new type of hybrid architecture that brings great opportunities but also bares risks.


CARPE NOCTEM SOCIETY


Over the past decades one can notice the change from a carpe diem society to a society that is additionally fascinated by carpe noctem (seize the night). Although it


is questionable if this trend is favourable, architecture and design need to adapt and offer attractive solutions to this transfor- mation. Often popular night time scenes in the urban environment show layers of much too bright lighting, including LED billboards of irrational sizes displaying commercials in combination with funky flashy media façades. In times of sensory overload and restless lifestyles shared amongst almost 7 billion people around the globe – it is crucial to create spaces that make a difference. It feels like it’s high time to take a breath and to rethink current urban lighting strategies that make endless use of light while believ- ing this would attract people. With the ex- ception of a few good examples of carefully designed array of media architecture, many city centres seem overloaded. The commercial on the single billboard isn’t watched anymore, because there are


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