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148 TECHNOLOGY / LED


tions such as retail and restaurant lighting where high CRI and lighting uniformity are required. OSRAM: Claimed a record efficacy value for a red LED prototype demonstrated in the company’s R&D laboratory (figure 15). The efficacy was 201lm/W at an operating cur- rent of 40mA, and over 168lm/W at a typical operating current of 350mA.


The record efficacy values were achieved for a 1sqmm chip housed in a laboratory package and emitting at a wavelength of 609nm. The red LED’s wall-plug efficiency was 61%. The company said that the increase in output was enabled by advances in thin- film technology. The results of this project can be extended to all the wavelengths in InGaAlP chip technology and Osram will be introducing the results of this development project across the entire wavelength spec- trum into production by the end of 2012.


DECEMBER 2011 BRIDGELUX: Announced a step change to the energy efficiency of their entire ES and RS LED range with a similar performance gain and cost reductions as introduced during the May performance increase. The latest products include the broad availability of ANSI specific colour targets, minimum 80 and minimum 90 CRI options for warm white, and 3 SDCM binning options.


PREDICTIVE TEXTS What to expect in 2012... XICATO: “The LED module segment will be firmly established. Future-proofing becomes a must-have feature. Detailed claims of ‘fu- ture-proof’ more carefully examined. Lumen maintenance standards established (LM-79/ LM-80/TM-21). Focus now shifts to main- tained colour quality over lifetime. Incan- descent lamp bans become tenable with the wider domestic usage of LED sources with a light quality on a par with them.” BRIDGELUX: “Although the LED Industry has been talking about the mass adoption of solid state lighting for many years, it is now reaching cost and performance thresholds that will enable a rapid expansion of ap- plications enabled by acceptable payback periods. LEDs can now address the quantity and quality of light needed to displace nearly all traditional light sources, dramati- cally expanding the potential for growth. The LED Array, a relatively new solution compared to the LED Emitter, has both enabled new lighting applications difficult to service with discrete emitters and sig- nificantly simplified the design process for Luminare OEMs. While no single light source is perfect for all applications, we expect to see significant market growth for LED arrays


as they address several key customer pain points and enable high quality lighting for a variety of applications. SEOUL SEMICONDUCTOR: “We will increase our production capacity from 1 billion to 4 billion LED packages per month with the launching of the second Ansan plant and plans to achieve economies of scale by increasing our production capacity and to enhance its role as a global LED manufactur- er. We will continue to invest approximately 15% of sales turnover in R&D every year and produce its own LED dies every two years. We are continuing to invest in acquiring patents and already have more than 6,400 which is one of the largest portfolios on the market. LED arrays will continue to grow but will not necessarily see the largest growth rate as flat panels, retrofit bulbs and tubes will also continue to grow as well.” LUMINUS DEVICES: “We believe that new markets and applications will require high- lumen directional illumination especially in entertainment, projection and UV LED lighting applications. 2012 will see improv- ing performance, quality and aesthetics of general lighting, focusing on high-lumen di- rectional fixtures, high centre beam candle power, and the elimination of multi-source shadowing. The LED industry will concen- trate on reducing cost and complexity by leveraging Lean Manufacturing plus the reduction of system-level complexity and cost.” IDRIVE: “During 2012 LED drivers will start to integrate sensors directly thus reducing the overall cost of LED lighting systems that need separate controls. Therefore, ambi- ent light sensors, occupancy sensors and even colour sensors that enable LED fixture to maintain exactly the same CCT, CRI and lumen values throughout the life of the luminaire resulting in zero lumen and colour quality maintenance degradation. The mar- ket penetration of LED drivers for healthy lighting will start as the market realises that high quality drivers with low ripple current and no LED pulsing offer improved visual experience can be simply integrated into lighting systems. Finally, customers will start to specify wide dynamic dimming range lighting systems that dim below 0.1% and act in a similar dimming fashion to incandescent or halogen light sources.”


CONCLUSIONS


2011 has been a solid year in performance gains for LEDs and LED fixtures, however the advance of OLEDs has been less stun- ning and they may be relegated to niche applications in the future due to a lack of investment to get OLED products to market.


The continuous improvement of LED qual- ity throughout 2011 has enabled LEDs to continue its dominant growth within general lighting applications. The improve- ment in lumen maintenance, colour consis- tency and efficacy means that T8 and T5 fluorescent lamp fixtures are now firmly in the firing line of LED fixtures. Retail light- ing applications have started to convert Halogen and CMH lamp sources to high CRI LED fixtures. Improvements in LED perfor- mance at higher operating temperatures with new flip-chip designs from Seoul Semiconductor for example, allow lighting fixture manufacturers to create improved products that will disappoint end users less when they compare actual lighting figures with their often falsified datasheets! 2011 has seen a reduction in innovative product launches (too many ‘me too’ products launched) but a general increase in the choice of LED products available to end users combined with a reduction in price enabled a rapid uptake in LED based lighting.


The advent of high efficacy, high CRI LED arrays has enabled compact, high lumen and efficacy outputs that now enable LED fixtures to compete with CMH and Halogen spot lights in retail applications. Further consolidation of lighting compa- nies will continue in 2012 with traditional lighting companies looking to further sup- port the higher value integration of control and building managements systems along with leaders in LED lighting. g.archenhold@mondiale.co.uk


Geoff Archenhold has been seconded twice to the UK Government to support the Lighting, LED and Photonics industry and currently helps LED companies develop business plans to raise investment from the finance community. He is an active investor in LED driver and fixture manufacturers and a lighting energy consultancy. The views expressed in this article are entirely those of Geoff Archenhold and not neces- sarily those of mondo*arc.


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