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onstrated the brightest, most-efficient, 60-watt standard LED replacement lamp. The prototype lamp shown in figure 1 is dimmable and emitted a warm, incandes- cent-like colour temperature of 2700 K, with a CRI greater than 90. The prototype delivered more than 800 lumens and con- sumed fewer than 10 watts. SEOUL SEMICONDUCTOR: Launched the Z6 and Z7 LED range. The Z7 offers superior thermal performance, high-brightness white LED manufactured with a special ceramic PCB. The Z7 offers 5,500K colour tempera- ture and 440lm brightness. In particular, the Z series offers an ultra-small package (9 X 7 X 3.2mm) for easy application to diverse indoor and outdoor lighting products. The Z6 as shown in figure 2 uses a multi-die emitter that enables full colour applications possible within a single package. The four LED chips in the Z6 package can be individu- ally operated in red, green, blue and white (1W each), operated at the same time, the white colour (4W) can be created in diverse colour temperatures (pure, warm and neu- tral). The Z6 is available in an ultra-small package (9 X 7 X 1mm), specially designed to create fancy lighting such as landscape lighting, stage lighting and digital signage based on full-color performance.


retail stores, residential settings, museums, art galleries, hospitality and landscapes and are the first commercial LEDs to deliver suf- ficient light output for these applications. The XLamp MT-G LED is the first in the industry binned and tested at 85 degrees C which simplifies luminaire design calcula- tions and speeds time-to-market. With a 9mm x 9mm footprint, the MT-G LED deliv- ers up to 560 lumens at 1.1A at 85 C or up to 1525 lumens at 4A at 85 C in warm white (3000K). XICATO: Launched higher efficacy versions


of a total of 168 LEDs that are arranged in fourteen parallel-switched series of twelve. The use of a ceramic package enables very good temperature performance where a 26W array retains 92% of its lumen package even when the array package case tempera- ture reaches 85C.


The new Sharp LED arrays also provide high CRI models up to 93 at CCT values up to 4000K and more impressive a typical CRI of 90 at CCT values up to 6500K.


MARCH 2011 BRIDGELUX: Announced it had achieved a major breakthrough with the demonstra- tion of 135lm/W GaN-on-Silicon based LED Technology. This represents the industry’s first commercial grade performance for a Silicon-based LED.


Figure 3: The multi-LED Cree MT-G.


Figure 2: The Seoul Semiconductor Z6 multi-die LED emitter with R,G,B and W die.


FEBRUARY 2011 CREE: Announced the commercial avail- ability of the LBR-30 LED lamp, aimed at replacing incandescent lamps commonly used in tracks, commercial and residential recessed downlights. Powered by Cree True- White technology, the lamp delivers warm- white light with unrivalled colour accuracy and efficiency. A CRI of 94 that delivers 600 lumens, the LBR-30 is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent BR30, while using only 12 watts of input power. The lamp is designed to last 50,000 hours in open fixtures. Cree announced a new lighting-class LED designed for high-output, small form-factor directional lighting applications shown in figure 3 using multiple LED die. The XLamp MT-G LEDs are optimised for 35W-50W halo- gen MR16 retrofit lamps and other accent, track, display and down lighting used in


of its top rated XSM 80 modules with effica- cy increases of up to 50%. However, beyond the significant advancement in efficacy, the new 1000lm/700lm/400lm modules are mechanically, optically, and thermally (still 90°C max rated) backward-compatible with the existing modules. Depending on the driver the luminaire manufacturer uses they are also electrically backward compatible. SHARP: Introduced the new 15 and 25W Mega Zeni models that are compact, light- weight, economical and extremely bright. The new models produce a light output of up to 2550 lumen (depending on the mod- ule), a luminous flux of up to 102lm/W and a long service life of 40,000 operating hours at a service temperature of 80°C. Measuring 24mm x 20mm x 1.8mm with an aluminium ceramic plate as the carrier material as shown in figure 4. The 15W Mega Zeni mod- ules are operated using a forward voltage of 37V and a forward current of 400mA. With the 15W Sharp Mega Zeni series, the round LED matrix consists of a total of 96 LEDs that are arranged in eight parallel-switched series of twelve. The luminous flux is be- tween 1350 and 1520lm (4000K 102lm/W). The 25W Mega Zeni modules also have a forward voltage of 37V but are operated using a forward current of 700mA. With the 25W series, the round LED matrix consists


When grown at scale, most LED epitaxial wafers use sapphire or silicon carbide substrates as the starting base material. But large diameter sapphire and silicon carbide substrates are costly, difficult to process, and not widely available. As a result, production costs have inhibited the wide- spread adoption of LED lighting in homes and commercial buildings. But growing GaN on larger, low-cost silicon wafers that are compatible with modern semiconductor manufacturing can deliver a 75% improve- ment in cost over current approaches. The 135lm/W performance was achieved at a CCT of 4730K using a single 1.5mm power LED operated at 350mA. These LEDs have extremely low operating voltages, requiring just 2.90V at 350mA and <3.25V at 1 amp. The low forward voltage and excellent ther- mal resistance of the devices make them ideally suited for high-performance, illumi- nation-grade applications. Optimisation of the epitaxy process on 8-inch Si wafers will make LED manufacturing compatible with existing automated semiconductor lines. Bridgelux believe this technology will be commercially available by 2013 and signifi- cantly improve the price per kilolumen of all LEDs. What is sure is that the move to a Silicon substrate will be a revolutionary step for the LED industry. CREE: Announced the availability of XLamp XM-L LEDs in neutral- and warm-white colour temperatures (2600K to 5000K CCT). The XM-L LEDs deliver unmatched performance across a wide range of drive currents. Warm-white (3000K) XLamp XM-L


Figure 4: The schematic cross section of a Sharp Mega Zeni.


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