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153 CONCLUSIONS


PHILIPS FORTIMO SLM GEN 2 LUMINOUS FLUX: 2363 EFFICACY: 87 LM/W CONSUMPTION: 27W RA: 85 R9: 26 CCT: 3855


The Philips Fortimo module utilises sixteen individual Luxeon A LEDs driven with a 1000mA driver and was second in terms of luminous efficacy coming in at 87 lm/W with 2365 lumens consuming 27.1W of power. The Fortimo seems to operate with eight LEDs in series and two banks of LEDs in parallel so the LEDs are run at 500mA. The Fortimo module had a good CRI value of 84.8 and an R9 value of 25.8. The Fortimo module utilises active cool- ing technology with a Sunon long-life ball bearing 0.28W fan attached to the rear of the heatsink to improve the efficacy and lumen maintenance of the module.


There are no problems with using active cooling technologies, however their use will be restricted by environmen- tal aspects such as airflow suitability, cleanliness of the environment such as dirt/dust and most importantly noise acceptance.


CREE LMH6 LUMINOUS FLUX: 2395 EFFICACY: 95 LM/W CONSUMPTION: 25W RA: 92 R9: 56 CCT: 4039


Individual LEDs within the module are tested and matched in order to meet the designed chromaticity specification by mixing the proportion of intensity from the 14 red and 24 white/blue LEDs incorporated into the light module as shown below. In order to achieve the CCT and CRI combination, Cree has utilised different white/blue bins on two LEDs (G5 and G11) but with such a large number of LEDs (36 in total) within the light engine one could argue this solution would be significantly more in cost to other modules tested and also explains the higher efficacy figures as the LEDs will not be driven as hard as other modules. The power spectral density of the Cree module is drastically different from the other LED module PSDs due to the inclusion of the two different white/ blue and red LEDs. Interestingly, the R9 value isn’t that high at 56.1 so colour rendering may not be as good as high CRI phosphor based LEDs with a wider more continuous PSD.


The modules all achieved greater than 70 lm/W (except for Xicato which always scores highly on colour consistency), offered CRI >80 and delivered more than 2300 hot lumens making them ideal solutions for replacing 2x26W CFL based downlights. Obviously, the results are based on the LED light engines by themselves and in order to be of use secondary optics need to be employed in order to deliver the light on task which will reduce the efficacy and lumen output figures. Interestingly, the LED modules achieve the efficacy performance in a variety of different methods from remote phosphor based systems, through arrays of individual emitters (single and multiple colours) to single chip on board LED arrays. In terms of cost effectiveness, one would suggest in the absence of pricing information from manufacturers, the COB solution from Osram would offer the best price performance ratio as it uses less packaging materials and provides high efficacy than multiple LED arrays. Again, as in the first module test, the variety of LED modules demonstrates the market is still embryonic and companies are still investigating what methods and technologies will provide the best overall performance, production yield and costs.


Special thanks go to Steve Poole and Paul Gilmartin of The Lighting Associa- tion Laboraties who carried out the tests. The bench tests were carried out at The Lighting Association Lab using LM-79 test protocol. A UKAS accredited laboratory located within the UK, LA Lab is also able to provide international CB test and certification in association with their certification body TUV Rhien- land. It is a UK Government appointed Notified Body under the Low Voltage Directive. www.lightingassociation.com/lighting- association-laboratories


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