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Top Executive Offices in Dubai - Linear LED lighting, completely concealed in an oversized window mullion, was developed with bespoke lenses to wash the ceiling disks with light in this penthouse office space. The disks can be illuminated in simple white lighting, single colour, or gradual colour change synchronised to other lighting details in adjacent spaces. Above ‘Light’ was a temporary art installation piece by dpa housed in the basement of a former slaughterhouse. The use of concealed lighting brought a sense of theatre to this daylight deprived environment complemented with optically controlled accent lighting, creating these light ‘paintings’. (Pics by dpa)


limits of working within boundaries. But predominately, we believed there was space in the market for an environmental lighting design company.”


Smiling, he continues: “It was a huge deci- sion; there was that nervous moment, like being stood at the top of a black run for the first time, sometimes you have just got to go for it! We recognised that the lighting industry is going through a massive period of change and subsequently the approach towards design had to react, grow and develop accordingly. We were at the stage where after years of working under limita- tions we wanted ‘fun’ and to unleash our creativity, without corporate restrictions. The role of a lighting designer is recognised but I think widely misunderstood and with the speed at which technology is changing we felt it an ideal time to really promote the value of considered and well designed lighting solutions. At Light Touch our aim is to work with our clients to help them un- derstand the benefits of good quality light, regardless of the project size or complex- ity.”


And now Light Touch PLD is born? “With only a handful of lighting specialists in the region


the area is hungry for education on the subject, yet many still have reservations,” Savage explains. “This is crucial and why we believe we are different. Perhaps some would say more open-minded to easing cli- ents into the concept of lighting designers. We are very much receptive to our clients’ unique requirements and those whom ini- tially do not feel the need for a full lighting design service. They want assistance, with flexibility, in accommodating and addressing their project need. We commence relation- ships with clients that previously may not have considered employing a lighting design specialist, yet, after the first collabora- tion, they appreciate the value we bring to the table; our contribution to realising their overall commercial objectives. They instantly recognise our wealth, enlisting us for their following project and so on. With lots of rogues in the market we offer valu- able protection to the client.” This approach is proving a success; still relatively young Light Touch PLD has already outgrown its primary offices, have and con- tinue to, recruit new talent to its team and are winning local projects. From a Royal Palace to high end offices in the prestigious


financial centre; hospitals to luxury retail outlets; whilst extending beyond the gulf with the likes of a Gentleman’s Club in China, and hotels in parts of Africa. After fourteen years in the lighting indus- try, Savage’s enthusiasm for the subject is uplifting to witness. He participates in regional lighting steering groups and ac- tively contributes to lecture programmes at universities and architectural design estab- lishments and conferences. He also doesn’t pull any punches on hot topics such as ‘the meaning of energy efficiency’. “All too of- ten too much emphasis is placed on energy efficiency; lighting should also be enjoyed,” Savage stresses. The subject of banning the GLS lamp is one that Savage fervently disagrees with, in fact he is keen to high- light the larger picture is often forgotten by the marketing spiel. “It is true that it (GLS) is an inefficient light source in terms of producing visible light, but converting to CFL lamps for every application because they are meant to be environmentally friendly is not the answer. If you look at the overall cradle-to-grave carbon footprint of a CFL lamp it is hugely worse than a GLS lamp. Most are not recycled correctly end-


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