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DETAILS


Djibouti Palace Kempinski is the first hotel in the African country and real proof that you can build a 5 star hotel anywhere in the world. The cost of power and ongoing maintenance were of high importance throughout the design process. Careful integration of lighting equipment within furniture and specific lighting details was key in creating a comfortable and relaxing ambience within this African / Arabic style hotel.


ing up in landfill sites polluting the earth, whereas the GLS is just metal and glass and therefore has no environmentally damaging afterlife.” As a blogger, and recently a speaker at the Index - International Design Exhibition in Dubai, Savage is championing the discipline to those that may not necessarily be up on the latest lighting trends in the region. He illustrates: “There is still a massive misun- derstanding and undervaluing of lighting on a whole; we all appreciate the value of sunlight and its health benefits, particularly in our hot climate, yet when it comes to artificial lighting people compromise their lifestyle, choosing light sources that are often inappropriate because they are per- ceived to save energy. My home is lit purely with GLS lamps and low voltage, not that I don’t wish to save energy, I’m very envi- ronmentally conscious, I just don’t believe in all cases the perceived energy saving sources are always the most efficient. People often take light for granted, it’s not there to be abused, the simple notion of the use of dimmer switches is all too easy to overlook.”


Savage continues: “To be honest, educa- tion plays a major influence. I’m passionate about people understanding light; I gain sat- isfaction when people recognise the quality of good lighting design and I use personal time to convey this message.” Savage’s passion for education continues: “I firmly believe I’ll never stop learning, tech- nology is constantly moving, at present the general consensus appears to be that LED is here to save the world and will replace every light source. This current, misconcep- tion opens exciting opportunities for light-


ing designers and gives us real possibilities to promote the pros and cons of every light source. However fantastic the LED revolu- tion may be, I for one hope that we never lose sight of what traditional light sources like our old friend the GLS lamp have done for our industry and the world of lighting. “Peoples’ focus is often misdirected and as they did with incandescent lamps they tend to focus on energy saving as the main driv- ing tool behind the use of new technologies. They see how much money they are ‘saving’ but in many instances appear to lose sight that it may not be the correct light source for the application or a healthy light to be under. With further advances in technology there is evidence to suggest that LEDs may be able to produce a full and even spectral distribution (healthy light) but we are not there yet and we should also look at the bigger picture. People see a new technology and want to love it because it is so called ‘green’. I am by no means condemning the solution, I just believe it has its place. Using the right light in the appropriate application regardless of technological advancement is also paramount.”


When Savage does have a spare minute you will find him running on the public beach (he completed the half marathon in neighbouring Emirate Ras Al Khaimah earlier in the year), cycling at Dubai’s Autodrome, playing tennis, or swinging his clubs with ‘The Dubai Divots’, an expat golf society which Light Touch PLD fittingly sponsor. Lastly, Savage’s hopes for the future? “Apart from world domination?” he teases. “I would like to see darker skies and brighter stars.” www.lighttouchpld.com


HIGHLIGHTS


Projects that you would like to change: Generically projects that contain lighting which does not relate to the environment in which it is in. Grids of downlights in restaurants for example that produce uniform / evenly lit bland spaces with no correlation to the wall finishes, furniture layout, and ultimately the use of the space.


Projects you dislike:


Any projects that wastes energy. No specific projects but for example, all too often (especially in the Middle East), exterior projects that have their own glow around them at night. We can all see where they are with their beacons of (wasted) light.


Projects you admire:


Architecture where the architect / building designer understands the building location, the climate, the sun path that will cast light on to the structure and hence it’s connectivity to natural daylight. The Pantheon in Rome, and the Pyramids for example.


Lighting Hero:


Reg Wilson (International Dark-Sky Association) and other inspirational lighting professionals fighting for dark(er) skies. Also Kevan Shaw for the true story on supposedly ‘energy saving’ lamps and other environmental issues.


Notable projects (whilst at dpa): • Djibouti Palace Kempinski, Hotel, Djibouti. • Uppingham School Chapel, Rutland, England. • Hertford College Chapel, Oxford, England. • Limitless Towers, Downtown Jebel Ali, U.A.E. • Carey’s Manor Hotel Spa, Hampshire, England. • ‘Light’ Temporary Art Exhibition, Clerkenwell, London, England.


• Villa in Jumeirah, Dubai, U.A.E. Current projects:


• Sharjah Palace, Sharjah, U.A.E. • German General Hospital, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. • Kempinski, The One, Abuja, Nigeria. • Al Reem Island Beach Club, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. • Gentlemen’s Club & Boutique Hotel, Beijing, China. • Noga Tower, Mixed Use Development, Bahrain. • Al Zain Jewellery Showrooms (throughout Middle East). • Prestigious high profile offices, DIFC, Dubai, U.A.E.


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