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154 TECHNOLOGY / PRODUCT REVIEW


Our product reviewer David Morgan takes a look at a luminaire with great potential for the architectural market: GE’s Lumination LED range.


LED GIVES GE THE EDGE


As the first company to produce a usable incandescent lamp back in the 1880s fol- lowed by a series of light source innovations throughout the 20th century, GE has cer- tainly got a long and successful track record in the lighting industry. In recent decades this leadership posi- tion has faltered to some extent and the other leading light source companies have grabbed a larger share of the new product headlines. As a luminaire company, GE has also ap- peared to lose momentum recently. There are still some HID road lighting and Hi-bay luminaires on the US web site but they are rather hidden away and hard to find. With the LED revolution, the lighting game has changed as the traditional US and European light source brands face a more uncertain future with an increasing chal- lenge from the major Asian electronics companies. To respond to this challenge GE has decided to beef up their LED interior range with new ranges of LED luminaires. The company


has recruited leading fixture designer Simon Fisher from the UK lighting and luminaire design consultancy LAPD to spearhead the project as general manager for indoor luminaire solutions in Europe, the Middle East and Africa The first results of this development were launched at Lightfair in Philadelphia last year where the Lumination range was presented. The Lumination range is based on a high efficiency LED panel and includes pendants, recessed ceiling tile products and an intriguing vertical suspended version with a batwing distribution for use in retail display. The first products to be introduced to the market are the recessed LED lighting panels designed for use in general commercial applications including offices, retail and circulation areas. There are two sizes in this initial range, 600mm x 600mm and 1200mm x 300mm. Designed to fit into standard exposed tee-bar ceiling systems, the overall thickness of the panel is only 14mm. The driver housing mounted on the


back increases this to 65mm which is larger than expected but still gives a low profile product in the crowded space above the ceiling. The key technology in these panels comes from a US optical film technology company - Rambus - which has a variety of patented high efficiency micro-prismatic materials marketed under the Pentelic brand. GE has licensed the material for the use in the Lumination range and it seems effec- tive as the optic is evenly lit across the surface from two rows of 18 Cree XP G LEDs mounted horizontally along the sides of the panel. It is understood that there will be two lighting distributions available. The launch products will incorporate a micro-prismatic optic that gives a Lambertian distribu- tion and the batwing will follow in later releases. The surface brightness is comfortable to view and it is understood that the panels comply with the required UGR 19 glare rat- ing for office lighting. Compliance with LG7


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