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A great surfing location on your doorstep


Pictures courtesy of David Ferguson R


iding waves in Jersey's St.Ouen's Bay goes back as far as the 1920s. St Ouen's


has the most consistent waves in the island for the simple reason that it faces west, the waves have been shaped by the full force of the Atlantic Ocean and most Atlantic swells entering St Ouen's can produce world class waves. The bay itself is one of many beautiful bay's in Jersey, much of it has been designated by the States of Jersey as an area of special interest which protects and preserves the geological, archaeological & wildlife aspects therefore protecting it's natural beauty.


Sand dunes to the south, rocky cliffs at the north and Jersey's largest stretch of fresh water in the middle, attracts much wildlife.


Along the five mile stretch of the bay, there is an abundance of beach breaks with around 15 named breaks that work at different tides and winds. The tides in Jersey can be particularly large, so local knowledge is a must if you want to catch the best waves. If crowds put you off though there are always waves worth surfing in between the named spots. So if you are new to the island or just starting out in the sport, pop into one of the surf shops and get the low down on where and


when you may catch the best waves or if you have any doubts about where is safe to swim the RNLI Lifeguards at St Ouen's will be only too happy to advise. The equipment used has come a long way since the early days of surfing when 14 foot wooden boards weighing 30-50kg were the norm. Now new fiberglass progressive short boards weigh just a few pounds.


The range of boards to ride now is also extensive, there are Nose riding longboards, mini males, fishes, gun's, standard short boards , body boards and many more. The choice is wide and you can buy boards for specific conditions from tiny waves, large, hollow, fast, or slow. A lot of board manufacturers now name their boards according to the type of waves the board is suited for and the type of person using the board. The names such as Fred Rubble, Cheese Stick, Elevator, Silver Spoon, Plonker, Sweet Pea, Flyer, to name just a few.


You can also surf all year round now in comfort due to the fact that wetsuits, booties, gloves and hoods are made extremely well, providing great flexibility and warmth. Most surf shops in the island stock the very latest equipment. So whether you are a youngster wanting to take up the sport by yourself or with


friends, or even a hard working entrepreneur, and you want to ride some waves either standing up or laying down, there's a board for you out there and a wave with your name on it. It will bring a great deal of pleasure into your life, so give it a try. If you'd like to go down the competitive road you may become a champion, and Jersey has produced many top European and even world class surfers.


Once the passion of riding waves is in your blood, be it body surfing, stand up or laying down on the waves, visiting great surfing locations, such as Indonesia, Hawaii, Morocco, South Africa, Ireland and South West France, is a must for many. If you would like to know much more about surfing in Jersey, get your hands on the recently published book, Surfing Secrets, which will give you fifty years of Jersey surf stories.


So surf's up… time to head for the waves; take care, respect and enjoy the ocean.


ByMARK DURBANO Local surfer


Surf School: From beginner to advanced, for group or private surf lessons.


Tel: 744157 or mobile: 07797 718150


Surf Shop: For boards, wetsuits, amazing clothing and so much more. Tel: 744157


Website:WWW.LANEEZ.COM email: laneeznick@yahoo.co.uk or mark@laneez.com


Jersey's Olympic Legacy Page 97


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