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As a mum of two boys, I fully appreciate that this is sometimes easier said than done. Treats are perfectly acceptable, but by educating them at this young age – especially before they hit puberty – they will then be informed to make those choices and make the correct decisions as they get older. They may not like tuna (or some other oily fish) when they are seven years old, but if by teaching them that it is good for them, when they are older they may be more willing to try it – particularly if the media plays its part.


As we know in our adult lives, nutrition is only one part of the story. In our normal daily adult routine we get up, drive to work, sit at a desk, and drive to do the shopping, pick up the kids, do our bit at home and then crash in front of the television. Here we have sat on our underactive glutes all day…and we wonder why we get backache! How do we encourage our children to become more active? Yet again our example is something we don’t really want them to follow. So are you going to the gym? Or the pool? Or perhaps a walk? It is known that one of the most influential motivators for children is their parents; if you are active, they will be active.


There are so many fun things to do now… Zumba, Bokwa, boxing. Perhaps the gym is not your thing; but we live in a beautiful Island – walking round St Catherine’s


yoga, street dance or games. It encourages them to try something new without signing them up for a whole term of one activity. Youngsters like to try things out before committing themselves to activities and our philosophy is to introduce life skills not only to the key stage one pupils, but also to our secondary students who are about to leave school and, dare I say it,


Woods on a Sunday afternoon; exploring the dolmens; pretending to be a spy around Flicquet….a little imagination can go far! Catch the bus to somewhere you don’t normally drive….


Again my philosophy to fitness is to make it fun! I have tried many things over the years and it was only when I converted from punter to trainer that I realised the only time I ever stuck at anything was when I really enjoyed going. Was it the music? Was it the fact that I could give my all for 45 minutes without worrying about anyone else? It doesn’t matter as long as it does “it” for you. Our children will learn from your experiences.


So I have started KIDROX, a non- competitive and fun activity centre for children. It is to encourage children to learn to like fitness – whether it is through boxing, circuits, Pilates, aerobics, zumbatomic,


especially the girls.


They need to be able to have the confidence to enter a gym and say ‘I can do Pilates’ and want to continue with their newly found skill.


So encourage your children to attend school sports sessions, and praise them when they have achieved something, however small.


Try to reduce the number of hours your child sits in front of a screen. Children who spend two hours a day in front of a computer or TV are more likely to suffer psychological difficulties than other youngsters, according to a recent UK study.


Many of the children I see are not the competitive sporty types (although those that are can always improve with Pilates and yoga – especially the boys!) and they are children that have little self-confidence as they are unable to ‘fit in’ with the sports teams at schools. These are the children that we are trying to help and to encourage so that hopefully it will make a difference to their future.


Jersey's Olympic Legacy


Page 67


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