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By MARK FAUVEL Fluid Architecture


Designing buildings that satisfyclients and please the public


Having been in the industry since the 1970’s I have seen vast changes to the way the States Planning and Environment department has functioned, not always for the better. One of the biggest failings of the States in general, has been a failure to plan for the future which is what should be achieved in conjunction with a good planning department that is properly resourced.


In my view, our States should empower the planning department to enable them to have a properly resourced forward planning section. This would not only deal with a rolling Island Plan, in conjunction with relevant parish authorities and private stakeholders. It should be a section run by someone with an entrepreneurial spirit and a vision for the future needs of the island.


MARK R. FAUVEL, Principal


Telephone: 481990 Mobile: 07797 732081


Email: markfauvel@fluidarchitecture.co.uk Website: www.fluidarchitecture.co.uk


The Property Services Department was formed some years ago to apparently resolve these issues and now we also have the Jersey Development Company. But frankly neither is the right vehicle and they have other roles to perform. Master plan instigation and all that


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stems from it, should be a function of a properly resourced planning department.


The latest 2011 Island Plan has established important policy on further protecting the environment, however, simply bringing out a new Island Plan every 10 years is not sufficient. A specialist Forward Planning Section resolving where best to build, not just housing, but the new police, fire and ambulance stations, a larger hospital, to mention just a few, and how to integrate new public open spaces into the town; that’s what’s needed to resolve the States drive to accommodate the ever increasing population.


In my view, it is disjointed States thinking and lack of vision that has also given us a harbour that badly serves its industrial and leisure functions, and a waterfront reclamation that could and should have been totally inspiring and not cut off from the existing town by a road system. Talk to retailers beyond King Street and Queen Street and they are all struggling because our town is not being developed correctly. All these elements should have been sorted out by


a Forward Planning Section decades ago, by implementing a comprehensive Town Master Plan that had vision, that then went on to create policy and design briefs for all areas of our town. This would have meant applicants and their architects would have known the design parameters for the various areas of town, before individual schemes were proposed. This would also have minimized delays for applicants of individual sites. Instead we have a system that by and large is reactionary, not visionary.


The current Planning and Environment Minister appears to be getting to grips with a number of the planning issues we currently face but there will be a limit to what he can achieve to repair previous damage. I hope he is given the chance and resources to carry this through!


The Planning Law changed in 2006 to enable greater recourse for objections to applications, but it has been the perceived errors of recent years that have generated a groundswell of opinion over planning issues and interestingly the Planning and Environment Minister is


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