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when you die then your partner would not be entitled to any share of your assets


“ If you and your partner are not married ”


Anne Hembry, Probate Manager& Sarah Hope, Probate Assistant, Voisin Law


A WILL- Before you wed!


dealt with in accordance with the law which may not be how you would want or expect.


Getting married has legal implications that extend far beyond your wedding day and your status as a married or single person, parent, step-parent or otherwise all have an effect on how your assets will be distributed when you die.


Sarah Hope of Voisin’s Wills and Probate team discusses the advantages of making your Will before you get married - a practical consideration often overlooked by those organising their wedding day.


Getting engaged and planning your wedding is one of the happiest times of your life. With so much to plan for the big day it’s no wonder that most couples don't even consider making or updating their Wills but failing to do so can have serious


Voisin law firm provide expert advice on Wills and probate. For advice on your particular


circumstances, please contact: Anne Hembry


annehembry@voisinlaw.com Tel. 500328


Sarah Hope


sarahhope@voisinlaw.com Tel. 500352


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consequences if the worst should happen.


Some of the headlines that are most poignant are those involving young couples who are just about to be married or are on honeymoon when tragedy strikes. The effect of that loss is traumatic enough but if you haven't made a Will when you die this can cause further difficulties for your loved ones as your assets will be


20/20 Legal Matters


By way of example, if you are domiciled in Jersey and die without having made a Will, leaving a spouse and children, your husband or wife is not automatically entitled to all your assets. In these circumstances, your spouse would be entitled to the household effects and the first £30,000 of your Personal Estate but only half of the remainder; the other half would pass to your children.


If you and your partner are not married when you die then your partner would not be entitled to any share of your assets, which under Jersey law would pass to your surviving blood relatives.


Exactly how your estate would be distributed depends on an extensive list of factors that an experienced legal advisor can guide you through, but the only way to guarantee that your assets will be dealt with in the way you would choose is to have a Will in place. It’s essential that you


have your Will prepared by a lawyer to ensure that its content properly reflects your wishes and that it is prepared and executed in accordance with the law to ensure its validity.


The Wills and Successions (Jersey) Law 1993 provides certain rights to your spouse and to your children whether or not you have a Will in place. By seeking legal advice and making a Will you have the power to decide who should deal with your estate, who should care for your children and who should benefit within the rules set out by law, should something happen to you. Voisin law firm are able to provide detailed and professional advice on your particular circumstances and ensure that your Wills clearly reflect your wishes whilst also complying with the Wills and Successions (Jersey) Law 1993.


Having a Will prepared is often a lot cheaper than people expect and is a valuable investment when compared with the potential expense that can be incurred where there is no Will, or where an outdated Will does not make provision for a dependant.


Above all else, having a Will in place, gives you peace of mind that if the worst should happen all your loved ones will be provided for and there will be no unnecessary legal complications.


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