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PROVISIONING


SASHIMI GRADE UNI OR SEA URCHIN GONADS FROM ALASKA


dishes, but we also received pea soup, warm oyster, arancini and chocolate fondant recipes with Venison Gusto goods. If anyone has new ideas we are happy to put them on our website www.venisongusto.com, and give a link to the chef’s site and of course advertise it on our social media channels.


Plans for next season include meats vacuum packaged and ready sliced, as he recognises not all Chefs have slicers on board, “It’ll make their lives easier and also open up a big market for us to be presented on the shelves of gourmet shops. Hopefully we can have our new big toy ready - slicing and packaging by the beginning of 2018’.


If you were to tempt a hand at crafting a menu from some of this expertise, you’d have to start with the new product from CRYS this season: The House of Luvienz has married the finest of French sparkling wine in the world with caviar to create


perhaps the most outrageous drink ever! Luvienz selected the Chardonnay grape variety that comprises most of the Cote de Blanc premium vineyards and caviar from one of the most renowned houses comprising the best of its marine and almond notes, to create a drink combining these two prestigious symbols of gastronomy. A bottle of the Brut Caviar Edition costs €1350,00 a pop, and a leather trunk of nine bottles, €20.833,00.


One of the favourite tipples of wine and spirit provisioner, Hervé at Cave 1862, is a Chardonnay: not too woody,


like a


Chablis 1er cru for example, or a Chassagne Montrachet. But if we’re talking cocktails and the guests are American he reckons they’ll opt for a white alcohol such as tequila, or vodka. The Brits go for rhum and the French like their whiskies. Or of course everyone loves Champagne to wake the taste buds. Says Hervé, “I recommend


red wine to continue. We usually think that in summer we shouldn’t be drinking red wine but this is a received idea. What matters while drinking red wine is to serve it at the right temperature, that means slightly cooled. This will go perfectly with grilled meat.”


So what should we look out for this season in terms of wine? Two recent events have strongly affected the yacht market wine wise points out Mike Shore, Managing Director at Berba on Monte Negro: the spectacular 2009 and 2010 harvests in Bordeaux, which saw already high prices jump into the stratosphere, and four consecutive low-yielding harvests in Burgundy (2011 - 2014 inclusive) during which yields were down about a third, on average. “This,” he says, “created scarcity of supply at just the time that thirsty new markets (hello, Asia) were discovering Burgundy, again pushing prices way up.” So, the net


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 99


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