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WITH THE PROVISIONING MARKET OVER BRIMMING WITH PREMIUM QUALITY SUPPLIERS OFFERING SUBLIME SENSORY DELIGHTS FOR CREW CHEFS TO SALIVATE OVER AND THEN SELECT, IT’S A RARE TREAT TO JUST HANDPICK A FEW SPECIALIST SUPPLIERS AND HAVE A DELVE INTO WHAT THEY CAN DELIVER. CLAIRE GRIFFITHS SIFTS OUT JUST A FEW SUPPLIERS WHO SOURCE THEIR PRODUCE WHERE THE SEAS RUN DEEP AND THE DEER RUN FREE


G


uiding us through the clear, cool waters of all that’s fishy, we headed directly for the experts and hooked


up with the Fish Society, sourcing Alistair Blair as our font of intelligence to tell us what’s what among the family of fins and gills.


The finest of all sea foods are turbot, Dover sole, halibut and wild Scottish salmon, Alistair tells us, and are unsurprisingly the mainstream items sold to the superyacht industry. The Fish Society gets the fine large specimens of these fish from the English Channel and Scotland and he tells us it’s only these larger specimens that provide the thick luxury cuts that this market insists upon. The Society spreads its net far and wide to source the 400 products that it sells, spanning almost every sea-facing country in Europe. “Many supply us with only one item, the one in which they excel,” says Alistair.


As far as new variations and cuts go, there’s been a marked hike in interest for


the Society’s sashimi range in the last couple of years and ‘chalkstripe’ belly cuts of salmon have become a signature Fish Society item. “Although,” says Alistair, “a humble relative to salmon, kingklip, a South African fish that is hard to source, has also proved a winner. Another big hit this year, after a lot of looking, has been sashimi grade uni, or sea urchin ‘gonads’ or ‘roe’, sourced from Alaska.”


Belly cuts or ‘ventresca’ are also hugely popular with the superyacht chefs and general ‘affishionados’ (sorry!); Explains Alistair, “These are from the chest meat of large fish. This part of the fish is always rich in oils which give a rich in-mouth experience. Tuna ventresca and black cod ventresca are our two signature ventresca cuts. Finally, I should mention ‘collars’. This is the triangle of meat between the belly and the gill, including the gill bone. That makes it a complicated item to eat but this oil-rich meat cooked on the bone gives a superb experience.” Dusky grouper collar, for example, sourced in French waters


costs £100.00 a kilo, but that doesn’t stop the orders flooding in.


Alistair likes to consider the Society as a curator of the 400 specialist items from sea and stream and in-house processing is limited to filleting and processing wet fish.


For smoked fish it uses different smokers for different fish types; and so there’s the haddock smoker in Grimsby, a Belgian specialist in maatjes herrings, a Dutch producer of smoked eel and the jellied eel man in East London. They also have five smoked salmon suppliers and three kipper specialists. The marinated herring specialist happens to be based in Scotland; the bacalao guy is in Portugal.


While most of the produce stocked at its 12 000 m² storage warehouse is supplied by ‘La Fénerie Food Distribution’, leader for more than 40 years for supplying luxurious hotels and restaurants, Cannes Riviera Yacht Supply (CRYS) actually smokes its own salmon at its warehouse in Pegomas.


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 97


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