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DECKING


diverse both from maintenance and from the optical design.”


Reinier Waardenburg points out there is already a lobby to ban teakwood in the industry. “Since there are alternatives, a lot of people think it’s not the done thing to abuse the planet, just for luxury, it is rather like wearing animal furs as clothing yet some people still like it.”


8


TO CAP IT ALL Why is it that yachts seem prepared to use fake wood on decks but not as capping rails? Tomas Gustafsson says, “Synthetic wood manufacturers are slightly limited by the size of the


extrusion we can produce but maybe it is because they don’t know that we can in fact produce capping rails made to look like real wood. “There is no reason why you cannot create capping rails in synthetic wood,” says Reinier Waardenburg. “We can supply a 1500m synthetic capping rail made with man made material that is significantly cheaper than real wood.”


Sacha Roebe says plastic teak has a very low intrinsic stability and is often used only to cover or conceal carrier material when used as a capping rail.


Richard Eikhoudt seldom meets this situation, since his firm hardly produces capping rails. “But,” he says, “When I am asked to offer a capping rail I always try to talk my client into mahogany, especially when it is to be varnished.”


Matthias Reviriego believes it is more a case of what the client is seeking to achieve. He says if they want the modern look they go for a stainless steel capping rail while the traditionalists opt for wood. “The fact remains,” he adds, “Synthetic wood looks very cheap while in reality it is almost as expensive as the real thing and has the added disadvantage that it cannot be varnished.”


9


SLIPPERY STUFF Real teak decks are praised for their general non-slip quality even when wet, although synthetic teak is often regarded as having even more grip and can provide a very solid footing, also when wet.


Tomas Gustafsson is not so sure. He says, “Real teak relies on the wood’s natural oils lasting to stop them from cracking and becoming slippery. He says, “When it is wet the oil comes to the surface making teak less non-slip. But our Flexiteek 2G doesn’t have this problem making it better than teak when wet.”


When it comes to the slip factor Luca Zaccagno believes the difference between the real and the synthetic teak is maintenance. “When the real teak is new,” he says, “the difference between fake and real is small but over time as teak losses its oils the synthetic deck comes into its own.” He says, “Our Heli-Teak product is a high density material that allows it to be highly resistant to impact, with excellent resistance to abrasion and chemical agents.” Sacha Roebe is quite sure Synthetic Teak offers better performance with its non-slip properties. But agrees, “It does depend on the material used.”


ROSCH YACHTS Rosch Yachts is a specialist for synthetic teak decks in Europe with a wide network of suppliers and fitters further afield. They offer you a wide range of colours and styles for the superyacht industry, from tenders up to megayachts. The material holds its teak like appearance and needs no maintenance. Rosch Yachts or one of the certified service partners are always available for consultations and will gladly discuss your ideas and wishes. Whether you’re looking to cosmetically upgrade a tender or beach deck area or have a complete deck fitted on an ocean going sailing yacht, the technical team at Rosch will be on-hand to discuss and honestly guide you through the project. For more details Tel: +49 40 23 55 70 79 or visit www.rosch-yachts.de


Reinier Waardenburg asks, “What does it mean when we talk about anti-slip ship decking and can anti-slip be measured? He answers his own question by explaining that it is possible to measure, saying “It is certain that you can walk on a soaking wet deck (even at an angle of 40 degrees) without having the feeling you will fall overboard at any time. But you need standards to measure this by. In case of the DIN 51097 that standard means that products are tested on a ramp flooded with a water and soap solution, while the slope of the deck is made steeper and steeper. The grip measured with bare feet needs to remain optimal; even when the slope is rolling and pitching to simulate force 10 winds.” He adds, “Easy-Tek passes the test with flying colours! The barefoot test subject remains upright until the deck is at an 44.5 degree angle. If a superyacht deck reaches this angle, you have a serious problem.”


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 141


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