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HAVING A PET ONBOARD CAN PLACE EXTRA STRESS ON CREW BUT THERE IS ALSO SOME FUN TO BE HAD AS ERICA LAY DISCOVERS


this lovely day, then BOOM! What the hell was that black puff ball that just bounced off the passarelle, tore through the aft deck knocking the bunch of flowers over, breaking a vase and scratching the varnished table before smacking into the glass doors with a wet thud, then flopping into the salon to have a good roll around on the cream shagpile? Ah, great! They’ve brought their dog. Who appears to resemble an oozing cross between Scooby doo and a Shetland pony. Lovely. What’s that noise? Wonders the engineer, bending to inspect the now broken sliding door before realising it’s the chief stew’s teeth grinding… Bringing animals onto yachts is fun isn’t it?


S


Like the beautiful big floppy (and a little smelly) Irish wolf hound, Bart, who arrived to spend a week on a 50m SY. He liked the engineer best, probably because he was also quite hairy. A kindred spirit. And one who didn’t mind stepping over him in the engine room, and stopped to give him ear scratches. Bart was a good boy. He wore socks so he didn’t scratch the teak, which made him slide around all over the place but he didn’t mind… and didn’t bark much or make a fuss. When he needed the loo he’d go to the aft deck and wait obediently for a crew member to pop him in the tender and take him ashore for a little leg stretch, a sniff, and to do


o, the owner and his family are about to board, the crew are lined up to greet them in their finest whites, the vessel is impeccably sparkling and twinkling in the sunshine on


his business. Then he’d hop back in and off he’d go back to the boat. The stews hated him due to his hair and slobber problem but by all standards, he was a little gem compared to others.


There’s the owner of the small sail yacht who liked to bring his 3 long haired cats with him on every trip. These were those mean cats… the sort who’d reach out to scratch you or trip you up when you were walking past, and it seemed they intentionally rolled around on every single surface to cover it in thick hair. That yacht can’t keep crew, I wonder why?!


HE LIKED THE ENGINEER


BEST, PROBABLY BECAUSE HE WAS ALSO QUITE HAIRY. AND ONE WHO DIDN’T MIND STEPPING


OVER HIM IN THE ENGINE ROOM, AND STOPPED TO GIVE HIM EAR SCRATCHES


Lots of dogs are trained to use a bit of astroturf for emergencies, however let’s talk about the owner’s bulldog on an old gaff rigged yacht. He’d bang his balls on every step down and let out a little yelp, and pooped in the winch handle sockets. Nice and easy to clean that up!


Bless the Siberian husky who was brought onto a charter by a well known chap. Poor doggo got seasick but the engineer says he was still easily the best behaved of the whole bunch. One to warm your cockles; the German shepherd, a service dog, who loved to go out in the tender for a cruise. She’d go sit there and patiently wait for someone to take her for a spin and would cry if you covered the tender, or took it out without her. The stew had to hoover three times a day as well as pick up the odd rubber toy but said she’d do it all over again to have her back onboard. Nawww.


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 71


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