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“I think I’ve settled into enjoying my life. I’m happy,” she says of the last few years as Mrs Urban. “I’m content. What more could you ask for?”


And yet, the inherent discordance continues between Kidman’s character and the numerous red carpet appearances, which she describes as ‘all a bit Cinderella’.


Thankfully for the star, she has long held an ace up her glamorous sleeve when it comes to getting away from it all in a style most befitting of her dual heritage to two nations which have had long relationships with the ocean surrounding them. Though her parents were Australian through and through, Kidman was born on a Hawaiian island and given the traditional name ‘Hokulani’.


The Polynesian-inspired moniker, meaning ‘heavenly star’, was repurposed years later by Kidman as the name given to her 46m luxury yacht, constructed by the American yacht building company Palmer Johnson and launched in 2007 after Kidman had settled down with Urban.


Unlike the unfortunate ocean going scenario Kidman found herself in Dead Calm, the Hokulani has been devised with sophistication and serenity in mind. Twin MTU 4000 engines capable of 3,650 horsepower each, and an aluminium superstructure allow the vessel to glide across the waves at a maximum speed of 29 knots, more than enough to escape the unwanted attentions of the press.


Inside the craft, the award winning design team at Nuvolari-Lenard have created an opulent yet tasteful interior fit for a star of Kidman’s calibre. With natural wood furnishings and fittings that point to the Italian firm’s love of favouring the traditional over the mechanical, all three floors of the Hokulani are spacious and open to natural light with vast panoramic windows and several lounging areas around the ship.


©Mark Robert Milan


THE POLYNESIAN-INSPIRED MONIKER, HOKULANI, MEANING ‘HEAVENLY STAR’, WAS REPURPOSED YEARS LATER BY KIDMAN AS THE NAME GIVEN TO HER 46M LUXURY YACHT, CONSTRUCTED BY PALMER JOHNSON


But just as Kidman on-screen marries all that is great about the heroines of classic Hollywood with 21st century production values, so too does the Hokulani offer several modern twists for those on board.


Each of the five luxurious guest cabins is equipped with modern entertainment systems (presumably so you can catch up on the hostess’s latest releases). The master suite is found on the lower deck and encompasses three levels, with a private study, walk-in wardrobes and a bathroom with personal jacuzzi.


With an easy capacity of 10, there’s plenty of room for everyone. For Kidman, however, there are of course a few fellow seafarers who are more important than others, namely her four children: adopted daughter Isabella and son Connor from her earlier marriage with Cruise, and daughters Sunday Rose and Faith from her relationship with Urban.


“I have many different aged daughters, so there are different fun things to do with each of them,” Kidman agrees. “And partly it’s my desire to keep them protected, and just enjoy things. I much prefer to go swimming!


“But getting away and being on the seas has always been a wonderful escape. It’s the sort of thing you can’t actually escape in somewhere like Cannes, but the harbour is always a magnificent sight at night.”


To that end, the Hokulani is packed to the gills with an assortment of high-tech water toys, from snorkelling equipment to jet skis, so that Kidman and her family can enjoy their time away from the glitz and glamour of a life spent in the spotlight to the fullest. Once aboard, it’s not just precious time away from her demanding career and the paparazzi lenses that Kidman gets from her time spent on the ocean – Hokulani also gives the well travelled star the opportunity to just pack her bags and sail into the sunset with family and close friends.


“It’s one of the reasons why I continue to act as well: because I quite like the gypsy life,” she agrees. “I like the idea of not knowing what’s around the corner. I like all of that and I think it’s very good to expose the children to different environments, different people and different countries.We got to live in France and Morocco, as well as back in Australia. We move a lot; it’s just part of our family.”


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 33


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