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ANOTHER BIG HIT THIS YEAR HAS BEEN, AFTER A LOT OF LOOKING


“It’s a best seller,” explains Sales Manager Nathalie Yta, “that and the oceans of Champagne we sell, especially during the Festival de Cannes and Monaco GP.”


It would be nice but, Gabor Ivanacz, Managing Director of Venison Gusto LTD, is probably not based alone with his beard in a timber hut, in the heart of a deep, dark forest of a faraway distant land. But he is based in Hungary in a village hundreds of miles from Budapest. It would be romantic to think he fells wild deer, water buffalo, wild boar and grey cattle with his own fair shot out in the wilds somewhere, but he does certainly cure, smoke and sell his own charcuterie and pork-free salamis rather successfully.


Maybe not ‘felled’ by his own hand, the animals he ‘works with’ are, he insists, raised in a most humane way with the red deer and wild boar living free in the wilds


and the livestock of buffalo and grey cattle raised in the fields of national parks far from any antibiotics, bovine human growth hormone (rbGH) or any artificial drugs.


Says Gabor, “The best seller almost every year is the red deer bresaola. More and more owners/charter guests are focusing on healthy, low fat products and our free range red deer bresaola is not just unique with an amazing taste, 100g of it contains less fat and less cholesterol then the skinless chicken breast, so we understand why it is popular.”


Other popular sellers include the ‘kosher style’ (no pork) salamis – red deer, buffalo or grey cattle that have a particular fanbase on board Muslim and Jewish boats.


The smoking and curing are done inhouse in the company’s own small facility in the village of Bataszek, 200 km away from Budapest.


Beech wood, either lightly smouldering or burning depending on the product, is used for the smoking.


The curing and aging in temperature and humidity-controlled-chambers are the last phases of the process but no less important than anything else that has gone before.


Gabor wants as many Chefs as possible to become familiar with the selection of salamis (15 types) and four kinds of bresaola, and he’s keen to show them the different ways to serve the meats, not simply for breakfast or as a charcuterie plate.


So far, the Chefs haven’t done too badly in conjuring up new recipes and any new ideas Gabor receives are put on the website to inspire others. ‘Some of them made meat sushi with the red deer bresaola, others made mayonnaise of the fat of the spicy red deer salami and served it with fish


98 | SUMMER 2017 | ONBOARD


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