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DECKING


painting, sanding or cleaning afterwards: it’s ready for use, instantly. Maintenance is very low: just flush the deck or use a power wash.”


Waardenburg believes teak to be more expensive and takes real craftsmen to install it. He points out that, “There will be less trees suitable for decking every year, therefore it will become scarce and therefore more expensive.”


5


LEGALLY SOURCED There has been talk in recent months of yachts using illegally sourced teak in the manufacture of decks. Bob Steber from Ginnacle Teak is well aware


that some yacht manufacturers are using illegal teak. He told us, “Some knowingly and intentionally and some without due diligence use Burma teak that has been smuggled into other countries generally costing less than 100% legal Burma teak. I live in Burma/ Myanmar and our company is a member of both the Myanmar Timber Exporters Association and the American International Wood Products Association. We stay focused on the latest information and regulations. It may cost a little more than smuggled teak but you will never need to worry about seizure of your ship and heavy fines for using illegal teak.”


Matthias Reviriego confirms, “There is a plentiful supply of real teak without legal documentation in the market place. This is because the sale of teak is a very profitable business and will continue until the last tree.”


Richard Eikhoudt reports, “I have read the article in Der Spiegel. I know it is being investigated right now, but there is no verdict yet. The wood we buy is all sold by MTE (Myanmar government) to local sawmills from where our main supplier buys it. He takes care of all the paperwork and I trust him to do it right.”


FLEXITEEK Flexiteek is the original patented synthetic teak decking company established in 2000 with consistent growth and double digit increases over the past two years. With 500,000m² of decking produced since inception, present demand is nearing 50,000 m² annually. The Flexiteek 2G (pat. Pending) material has contributed to the increase in weight savings and more importantly, the cooling benefits over outdated 1st generation products. Flexiteek 2G looks and feels just like the first generation of world leading decking, however, with the 35% reduction in weight and that it cools 30% faster, this has addressed the concerns of boat builders and consumers over the years that have been associated with synthetic decking with being too hot and heavy. For more details Tel: +46 223 100 00 or visit www.flexiteek.com


EASY-TEK Dutch brand Easy-Tek has developed the first DIN 51097 / DIN 51130 certified ship deck! In the world of superyachts it is of the highest importance to work according to DIN/NEN standards and to apply materials that can comply with these heavy standards. Simply stating that a product has anti-slip qualities, is fire retardant, doesn’t get hot, doesn’t discolour and can last up to 25 years, is not enough. Every claim needs to be thoroughly tested and documented to make sure the consumer is ensured of a first class product. These products were pushed through rigorous testing procedures to be awarded The German standard DIN 51130 which was no piece of cake either. For more details Tel: +31(0)294 237 975 or visit www.easy-tek.com


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 137


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