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DECKING


10


COST It is a cruel fact of nature and manufacturing processes that while the cost of using teak rises the costs of using the synthetic alternatives is falling. The demand for high


quality teak is far surpassing supply, and this has created the boom in the market of synthetic teak.


Do yacht owners who, by their very presence are not strapped for cash worry about the cost? The answer appears to be no. Shipyards are reporting there is no slowing in the demand for real teak just a slight unhappiness in the rising cost of getting the best. Synthetic decking is typically around 30-50% cheaper than the cost of Burma Teak. On large decks, this can make a substantial difference but brokers involved in the sale of yachts quickly point out that yachts with fake teak are more difficult to sell with buyers asking for significant discounts in the selling price so that a real teak deck can be installed during the almost inevitable post sale refit.


It is quite hard to pinpoint which yachts have synthetic decks and which do not. It used to be that the grander shipyards would never stoop so low as to install what they saw was an inferior product. For many years the top end shipyards frowned on synthetic teak and snorted contemptuously when its use was suggested. Finally they began to agree that its use was a good idea in tender garages and heli-decks if only because of its oil spill stain resistance. Little by little that attitude is beginning to change and we can say with confidence that when Steve Jobs walked the finished decks of Venus he was not walking on wood.


Tomas Gustafsson reports the use of synthetic teak is gaining ground proving his statement with this additional comment, “We have recently completed two yachts, a 90 and 96 footer, for Southern Winds Shipyard as well as yachts for Royal Huisman and Feadship. S/Y Samurai was also re-decked in Flexiteek 2G.”


Synthetic teak offers cost and maintenance benefits over real teak. But as Chase Millar of World Panel Products in the USA


GINNACLE TEAK Serving the boating industry for 40+ years with the finest quality Burma teak, Ginnacle Teak specialise in beautiful golden Superyacht decking for yacht builders and direct to yacht owners. They offer sawn teak lumber and solid teak flooring for discerning clients owning a luxury yacht or villa. Contact Ginnacle Teak if you have a particular question about Burma Teak, or want to order direct from them. For more details Tel: Singapore: +65 9759 7687 or Burma: + 95 9 253 083 523 or visit www.teak.net


suggests, “Real teak on a boat is a very beautiful thing. It has taken a long time for the wood to grow and be selected. It is always going to be more impressive on the better built superyacht.”


As to our own view? We personally love the look and feel of a real teak deck, but would really like it to possess the maintenance qualities of a synthetic one.


CONTACTS


Classic Yacht Shipwrights ellen@cys-sl.eu Easy Tek / TEK DEK info@td-sc.eu Flexiteek International AB Tomas@flexiteek.se Gemini Teakdekken pmb.beheer@gmail.com Ginnacle Teak teakwood@singnet.com.sg Helidecks Italy info@helidecks.it Karinthia info@karinthia.eu Marinedecking S.L. info@marinedecking.de Modesty Yacht Carpentry jon@modesty.es


ONBOARD | SUMMER 2017 | 143


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