search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Visual, design and code – the game’s engine and


mathematics can never be underestimated. Music and


sound effects are essential, as does having the ‘right people’ on the team. I’m particularly


proud of the creative vision our team shares, and believe that our collective understanding and deep knowledge of our product helps us to deliver some truly amazing games.


never be understated. With this in mind, it’s a major part of our vision and strategy for our new projects, as well as taking a step back from existing games we have in development to work out how the process can be improved.


Starting from a blank canvas, how and where do you begin the creative process?


During the project development stage we go all in. Of course, while some of these ideas and mechanics are incredible – they unfortunately can’t match the with theme or concept of the project. No good idea in the creative process is wasted however, and we keep them stored to be ready for us once we have a theme that suits them.


Having said that, we try not to overload our games with innovation for innovation’s sake – it’s essential to keep a smart balance in all of our products, instead of working in the latest shiny tech just because it’s there. Once we’ve made it past the initial creative stage and we have enough ideas and features to begin shaping our idea, I “place” them on a blank canvas and start brainstorming with the wider team as to how we’re going move forward.


What are the most important elements in creating an appealing game?


Besides the obvious elements – visual, design and code – the game’s engine and mathematics can never be underestimated. Music and sound effects are essential, as does having the ‘right people’ on the team. I’m particularly proud of the creative vision our team shares, and believe that our collective understanding and deep knowledge of our product helps us to deliver some truly amazing games.


How many design iterations do you have to go through before reaching the final concept?


When it comes to game design, process is king. We have the same pipeline of production for all of our games, and it all starts with the design document describing concept, setting, location, gameplay and mechanics.


Once approved, we work out exactly how the game will function, and begin working on a design mood board for all team members to brainstorm on visual elements, symbols and first sketch files. After that we look at the prototype of the overall game structure.


To minimise design iterations during the final production stage we collect all feedback and


begin analysing the prototype stage – and at this point we look to answer the ultimate question – whether this product is solving the problem we set at the very beginning.


What is the relationship between the mathematics of the game, the artistic style and its sound design - and which is the most important in your view?


I believe that visual elements capture the most attention, but how the game actually works, and what makes a player tick, is most important. Everything needs to be in perfect synergy for the product to make an impact on market.


At ICE 2018, Evoplay Entertainment unveiled 3D/VR slots. How different is the design process for 3D/VR games compared to traditional slots? What kind of opportunities and challenges does 3D/VR present from a design standpoint?


Te principal limitations of 2D are the weight and low variations that comes with it. Identifying the difference between 2D and 3D is easily recognisable. It’s easy to pick up on the unique atmosphere created in a 3D environment, it quite literally gives the feeling of a magic world surrounding you and responding


NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA P93


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112