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Lewis Pek Editor


Comment


November 2019


On October 15, the BBC in the UK published a story headlined: “Child Gambling a ‘Growing Problem.’ The article focused upon research conducted by Cardiff University, which had analysed data from 11-to-16 year olds at secondary schools in Wales. The respondents were asked a range of questions about gambling, including if they had gambled in the last 12 months.


The study found that 41 per cent had undertaken some form of gambling in the past 12 months, noting that fruit machines were the most popular form of gambling. “This many be particularly problematic given their availability and potential to become habitual due to high operant conditioning processes, high event frequencies, near-miss opportunities and short interval payouts.”


This story was picked up and run in every UK newspaper and featured on the evening and mid-day television news.


On October 23, the UK Gambling Commission published its 2019 Young People and Gambling survey, which looks at gambling trends of 11-16 year olds in Great Britain. The findings show that 11 per cent of 11-16 year olds spent their own money on gambling in the seven days prior to the study, compared with 14 per cent in 2018, showing a long-term trend of declining participation since the questions were first asked in 2011.


THE UK GAMBLING COMMISSION STUDY FOUND THAT GAMBLING PARTICIPATION FOR 11-16 YEAR OLDS HAS FALLEN IN THE UK


The most common type of gambling activity that young people are taking part in is private bets for money (eg. with friends) at five per cent, with a further three per cent playing cards with friends for money - so eight per cent in total. The research, conducted by Ipsos MORI, also shows that three per cent buy National Lottery scratchcards and a further four per cent played fruit or slot machines in the past seven days, an activity that typically takes place in family arcades or holiday parks.


This report was circulated to the national press, including G3, at 9:30am on the 23rd. And so we brought up all the news feeds and started hunting through the national press stories. We turned the radio onto the BBC in the office and waited for the news bulletins and midday news. Nothing. No one reported on the survey. There was nothing in the national press and not a peep on the radio or television throughout the day and night. In this issue of G3 we have published the summary of the report from the Gambling Commission. Firstly, because it’s genuinely interesting. And secondly, from a sense of righteous indignation.


EDITORIAL


G3 Magazine Editor Lewis Pek


lewis@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0) 1942 879291


G3Newswire Editor Phil Martin


phil@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7801 967714


Features Editor Karen Southall


karensouthall@gmail.com


International Reporter James Marrison Staff Reporter William Bolton


william@gamingpublishing.com Contributors


Sebastian Loaiza, David Marshall, Steven Spartinos, Annamaria Anastasi, Eoin Ryan, Roman Sadovskyi, Rubens Loeches


P4 NEWSWIRE / INTERACTIVE / MARKET DATA ADVERTISING


Commercial Director John Slattery john@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7917 166471


Business Development Manager James Slattery james@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)7814227219


Advertising Executive Alison Dronfield alison@gamingpublishing.co.uk +44 (0)1204 410771


PRODUCTION


Senior Designer Gareth Irwin


Production Manager Paul Jolleys


Subscriptions Manager Jennifer Pek


Commercial Administrator Lisa Nichols


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