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becomes a brand in itself. People come down here for the demo and also to see their RIB being made. It’s a nice place to visit, stay and eat.


Ella: There are loads of skilled peo- ple here including many who are experienced in the marine industry who you wouldn’t find elsewhere. There are also many who have just grown up on the water and on boats and I’ve known them since childhood. Although Dartmouth is out on a limb, there are also some massive benefits to being here - the people and an amazing testing ground right on our doorstep.


Why did you decide to call the company Ribeye? Peta: It is a play on words - RIB and the Eye of Horus which is an ancient Egyptian symbol for safety at sea. It is a falcon’s eye which features a lot on Greek warships in ancient mythology. It is a very striking logo.


What style of RIBs did you start off with? Peta: We started off with a sports RIB available in two sizes, called the Ribeye Sport. And then we introduced the Ribeye Playtime, of which there were three models, so we had five models almost straight away. The biggest RIB in those days


was eight metres and the smallest one was five metres, so they were sizeable RIBs. We probably have about 20 different styles now. RIBs weren’t quite as sophisticated 20 years ago but we’ve always spe- cialised in deep V hulls especially as UK waters are quite challenging so you need a deep V for stability, safety and a soft, dry ride. The


Although Dartmouth is out on a limb, there are also some massive benefits to being here - the people, and an amazing testing ground right on our doorstep.


sports RIBs were based on a racing RIB hull for people who wanted to go fast, but also wanted to be safe.


How have you developed the company? Ella: We have gradually modern- ised everything. In 2014 we start- ed hi tech infusion manufacturing which is the most modern way to use glass fibre. It’s bigger boat technology. It’s a lot cleaner and a lot more efficient and the finish is


a lot stronger and tends to be a bit lighter as well. We do have incredi- bly skilled people working here.


What is your most popular RIB? Peta: The A600 which started life as Playtime 600. It’s a very good family RIB, you can get a lot of people in it sitting in safe seats, and it trailers easily. Ella: It’s an amazing all rounder. You can take it completely off shore as well, it’s a lot more capable than other RIBs that are a lot larger, you can come in and moor up on on visitors pontoons and take it out to sea as far as you like. It’s our most imitated RIB.


Do you find that other companies often copy your designs? Ella: Yes, overseas manufacturers do. There is nothing we can do about that. We just take it as a compliment.


How much do your RIBs sell for? Ella: They start from £30,000.


How many boats do you work on at any one time? Ella: We usually build five at a time.


What are your future plans? Will you expand again, and will it be in Dartmouth? Peta: Yes we really want to stay


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