search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
127


A forward looking PUPIL PROFILES:


KIRAN Age: 10 After school fun: Playing with toys and messing about on the computer. Favourite snack: Dried mangoes. Scariest act: Definitely a zip wire on a school trip. Favourite TV programme: Pokemon. Breakfast Choice: Buttered crackers. Favourite subject: Science (because I want to be a marine biologist).


DAISY Age: 6 Top sandwich filling: Tuna World travel ambition: Canada (because I would love to see the bears). Best sporting achievement: Going ice-skating (it was very slippery). Favourite subject: Maths (because I love working out sums).


MATTHEW Age: 6 Career Ambition: Spy. After school fun: Watching TV with my brother. Best school dinner: The roast of the week. Favourite snack: Prawn cocktail crisps Favourite subject: Maths (I like testing my granny).


pupil DELPHINE, AGED 11. Delphine is a member of the school’s Global Citizen’s Club. During weekly meetings pupils discuss issues that need to change in school, the local community and globally. They recently wrote to the company that provides milk to the school asking them to come up with a greener alternative to the cartons with plastic straws that were being supplied. “We now get big bottles which we can pour into glasses. It’s so much better for the environment. We also got school to stop putting fish and chips lunches in polystyrene containers.” She says they have persuaded teachers to provide a little area in the playground where pupils can chill out and read or chat. “It’s a really good place to go if the playground is too noisy or boisterous.” Blackawton is working towards becoming ‘a fully Rights Respecting School’ which means it stands by a charter that focuses on pupils’ well being. “One of the Articles we have learnt says you have ‘the right to an opinion and for it to be listened to and taken seriously’. If there’s an argument in the playground we have peer mediators who step in and talk to each person about what the problem is and what can be done to solve it. It’s usually sorted out that way, but even if a teacher does have to get involved they never get cross or blame anyone; they always take the people aside and talk it through.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164