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Sea Rescue Heart-felt thanks are due to our sea rescue services for their prompt and professional help on December 21st last. Three scallop divers were out beyond Start Point towards the end of their dive; two in the water and one remaining on their boat. As the engine was running and noise was being made sorting scallops the cries for help from the two divers in the water could not be heard. The emergency was the result of the inexperience of one of the divers who surfaced and let go of his anchor line, little realising the power of the running tide near Start Point. His more experienced partner tried to reach more line so that the float would become visible to help the boatman see their problem, but unfortunately his air began to run out and he could not dive to release more line. He then made the decision to let go of his own anchor line in order to try to save his buddy from being swept away.


Around Kingswear BY MIKE TREVORROW It became immediately apparent


that there was no coping with the tidal race and the divers jettisoned their weight belts and just kept afloat in the current hoping that they would be seen. The situation became very serious indeed as it was rapidly becoming dark and the boatman was unaware of the potential tragedy unfolding near him. Very luckily indeed there was a


walker on the cliff path who could see the problems unfolding. He contacted the emergency services on his mobile phone, staying on his phone long enough to guide the Salcombe lifeboat and the Air Sea Rescue helicopter from Newquay to the scene. They picked up the divers who, thanks to their dry- suits, were still in reasonably good shape and returned them to their boat. The rescuers were rewarded with scallops – that was the very least the divers could do under the circumstances – but their families will be donating generously to the RNLI in very grateful thanks for


their courage and experience. One of those families is our own; our son was shaken and frightened by this experience. He is much wiser, of course, after the event. However, we would really like to know who the splendid guy on the cliff path was - the one who ran-up a big mobile bill to save the lives of others. If he reads this or if you know who he is please get in touch with us (01803 752928) so that we can thank you/him properly. In the end the lesson learned is


that two apparently small errors of judgement made in these extreme conditions could so easily have led to two young lives being lost. The three divers involved have learned the hard way here, but I do hope that their mistakes may act as a warning to others to take great care, never to be casual when in such dangerous conditions.


Pontoons Only


Just by way of information: the pontoon in Jubilee Park in Kingswear is soon to undergo repairs. Parish councillors are collecting prices for replacing the floats on the pontoon since the existing ones have worn to the extent that some polystyrene granules have been released in to the creek. This is clearly a situation which cannot continue. It is not easy to source replacements but please be aware that councillors are working very hard to remedy the situation as soon as possible.


Photo taken by David Dancox of the Salcombe lifeboat crew showing two VERY grateful divers who have been rescued.


You may be aware that some of the needed line-painting on our roads has been completed, although there is still some work to be carried out. One of the


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