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75 Book Review


Fine by Gail Honeyman and published by Harper Collins. It seems to be top of everyone’s list at the moment and unsurprisingly won the Costa Book Awards 2017. This piece of debut contemporary fiction is a life- affirming tale which tackles the issue of loneliness and has, like many of my favourites, a touching combination of humour and sadness and a thought- provoking heroine.


1


Childrens Books) by local author and Roald Dahl Funny Prize Winner Peter Bently. This heartwarming and charming tale, illustrated by Charles Fuge, would suit anyone’s junior library with a story about Bramble Badger opening up his home to a growing group of friends.


2


Kate Ellis. The Mechanical Devil (Piatkus) sees Detective Wesley Peterson appearing in his 22nd book in a story set on Dartmoor. With twists and turns and weaving crimes of past and present it is quite simply ‘chilling and unputdownable’ - Bookseller.


3 4


My pick which I’m hoping will feature on my birthday pile (hint…hint…) is How to Eat a Peach by Diana Henry and published by Mitchell Beazley. As it’s not out till April I’ve yet to feast my eyes but as an


Another local author who is publishing again this year is prolific crime novelist


Next on Andrea’s list is the children’s picture book A Home Full of Friends (Hodders


Unashamedly, both Andrea and I are plumping for current bestseller Eleanor Oliphant is Completely


by Emma Jones Celebrate with Ten of the Best!


Just in case you hadn’t realised we’ve lots to celebrate this year and what better than to kick off with a selection of the top ten books around at the moment. As it’s a special occasion I’ve picked up a few hot tips from those in the know - aka Rowena in the Flavel Library, Andrea in the Community Bookshop and Emily in the Dartmouth Bookseller. So where to start ?


avid (almost embarrassingly) fan I’m sure it will delight with new recipes to tempt my taste buds and enthuse me in my new kitchen! This seasoned food writer has been creating menus since she was a teenager and this book is a real celebration of seasons, flavours and places. Subtitled “menus, stories and places”, Diana ‘cooks up feasts for family and friends based on meals she has cooked and loved over the years.’


published The Devon Cookbook by Kate Reeves- Brown & Phil Turner (Meze Publishing). There’s definitely a celebratory feel to this one as the author has collaborated with Food and Drink Devon to include regionally sourced recipes from the county’s best foodie businesses from Michelin starred chefs to no-nonsense hearty food. Look out for creations by Dartmouth’s very own Bayards’ Cove Inn and Café Alf Resco.


5


first recommendation from Rowena from Dartmouth Library. She is an avid reader, runs a couple of book clubs in town and is always keen to recommend inspiring reads for anyone. The first 2 books in the recent Tim Pears Trilogy The Horseman followed by The Wanderers were top of her


6& 7


The local theme appears in the


Whilst we are on food I’m going to give a plug for the recently


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