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31 Specialist Maritime Antiques W


hen hearing the phrase ‘maritime antiques’ many people perhaps often think immedi- ately of a ship’s brass fixtures and fittings or


perhaps scrimshaw or model boats. However, when you look more closely at the range of maritime and nautical related objects that can be found at auction, like medals and tokens, ceramics and glass, paintings and sculpture, Naval arms, armour and uniforms, the category covers a great number of disciplines. As if that wasn’t a wide enough area to remember, there is also the scien- tific and technical knowledge that one has to gain with the history of navigation and navigational instruments. Even before it was proved that the earth was not flat, ancient astronomers and sailors had observed that the angle of the horizon to the Pole star was not the same at different points on the earth, hence the early concept of latitude. After Magellan had completed his


Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood Okehampton Street, Exeter. EX4 1DU Tel: 01392 413100 www.bhandl.co.uk


circumnavigation of the earth in 1522, the funda- mental equation of ‘the latitude of an observer is equal to the distance of the zenith of the heav- enly body plus its declination’ could be applied. The first instrument of navigation used for this purpose was the Astrolabe like the 19th century Meghribi brass Astrolabe example shown here (see below - Estimate £800-£1000*). At the same time the necessity of maintaining more accurate time keeping aboard ship was solved by using a Universal Equinoctial Ring dial (above left - Estimate £200-£300*). By determining the hour for any given latitude any number of naviga- tional problems can be resolved. As the devel- opment of more accurate clocks and chronometers be- came more widespread after John Harrison‘s first Sea Clock, H1 of 1730, eventually using a ship’s chronometer such as the example by Thomas Mercer shown here (Estimate £800-£1200*) and a sextant, the perils of navigation by dead reckoning could be avoided. The closing date for entries to the Specialist Maritime Auction is Friday 27th April 2018, For more information contact Brian Goodison-Blanks 01392 413100. *NOTE: Lots subject to Buyer’s Premium of 25.2% incl. VAT @ 20%


ANTIQUES, CERAMICS & JEWELLERY VALUATION DAY KINGSBRIDGE


Tuesday 17th April Harbour House The Promenade Kingsbridge 10.00am - 1.00pm


All enquiries please call 01392 413100 Sold for £17,000


St. Edmund’s Court, Okehampton Street, Exeter. EX4 1DU T: 01392 413100 W: www.bhandl.co.uk


E: enquiries@bhandl.co.uk


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