search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Looking back and looking to the future of BRNC with Captain Jolyon Woodard


Britannia Royal Naval College has been educating world-class Naval Officers since 1863. That’s a huge amount of history, but for this 10-year anniversary edition we will focus on just a snapshot, looking back over the past 10 years and predicting what is to come in the next 10.


C


aptain Jolyon Woodard has been running BRNC for 18 months. He says the


Navy is constantly changing and having to adapt to the complex threats and challenges that have appeared in the world in the past 10 years, “pirates and terrorism for instance.” Then there are the ever- decreasing budgets and lower fleet numbers. But he says some things remain steadfast: “our purpose, our resolute dedication and commitment to the people in the Navy – without whom we wouldn’t be able to function.” When it comes to the training methods Jol says the approach has changed over the years and is very different to that even of 10 years ago. “The strict ‘blanket technique’ of teaching has been cast out in fa- vour of a more individual approach where we try and understand the needs of each cadet. This gets better results as we can work more closely with the young men and women adapting teaching meth- ods if necessary.” He says visiting officers who trained here in the 80s


or 90s would notice a big differ- ence in the classroom. Jol believes the College has


become more diverse and inclusive over the past few years with people from more varied backgrounds coming to train in Dartmouth. The type of courses on offer is also expanding with Royal Naval Reservists and Royal Fleet Auxilia- ries on site. The auxiliaries are civil


“I hope all these


investments in our future will show the outside world that we are committed to keeping the College here.”


servants who man the ships that provide the fleet with vital supplies. “Our international dimension is growing as well – over the past three years we have trained cadets from 44 countries, and I suspect total countries trained numbers around 50. That means hundreds of foreign cadets have left here ready


to serve their country’s Navy. These growing links with other countries are crucial.” Since 2008 the College has been


home to the headquarters for the Royal Naval Leadership Academy. It means senior sailors and officers at all levels across the RN attend courses run by BRNC to further develop and prepare them for promotion. Jol says it’s great for the College as it gives them another focus and it provides a chance for the young cadets to meet and learn from naval personnel at varying stages of their career. He is also keen to point out that


on a practical teaching level the time cadets spend at sea during their initial training has recently increased. It is now back up to six weeks. “Four years ago it dropped due to low fleet numbers. But the need for this vital early training sea exposure never decreased so I am thrilled that it has now been raised again. Only last month three coach loads of cadets left here bound for HMS Ocean and HMS Albion.” The College has always employed


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164