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67 5


The acclaimed war poet and novelist, Robert Graves, spent several years living and working at Galmpton during the Second World War, and some


scholars have described this as one of his most prolific periods of writing. In 1936 he made his home at Vale House in Greenway Road, and could often be spotted pottering on the creekside by the Dart with his children. It was a spell of relative calm in the turbulent life of the I Claudius author and classics scholar.


7 8


Acclaimed author Nevil Shute based much of his


novel, Most Secret, in Dartmouth, and it was so accurate it was censored until after the war. It was written in 1942 but censored until 1945. It is narrated by a commander in the Royal Navy and tells the story of four officers who launch a daring mission at the time when Britain stood alone against Germany after the fall of France. Genevieve is a converted French fishing vessel, manned by four British officers and a small crew of Free French ex-fishermen armed with only a flame thrower and small arms. Their task is as much psychological as military – to show the Germans they will one day be beaten back.


Dartmouth born actress Rachel Kempson spawned a thespian dynasty after marrying Sir Michael Redgrave. On leaving Rada Rachel’s career took off with spectacular success and she worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company, the English Stage Company and the Old Vic. All three of the couple’s children, Vanessa, Corin, and Lynn, became hugely successful and talented actors in film and theatre, and their own children, among them Joely and the late Natasha Richardson, and Jemma Redgrave, continued the acting line.


9


In 1811, the 36-year-old artist J.M.W. Turner visited Devon and his sketchbooks show he spent several


days in Dartmouth. His drawings were very rough but show the old Quay House, Paradise Fort, the ropewalk and the lime kilns, Warfleet Creek and small sailing boats drawn up on the beach at the head of the creek. The visionary artist used several of these sketches as the basis for watercolours which in turn were made into engravings.


6


Novelist Flora Thompson wrote Lark Rise to


Candleford in Dartmouth. With her husband John and their three children, Flora moved to the The Outlook in Above Town in 1927. Lark Rise was published in 1939, followed by Over to Candleford and Candleford Green. The three stories were published as a trilogy in 1945, as Lark Rise To Candleford. Flora died in 1947 and is buried in Longcross Ceme- tery where a book-shaped memorial marks her grave.


10


The Anglo-French impressionist painter, Lucien


Pissarro, painted 16 pictures of Dartmouth when he visited the town for six months in 1922.These include landscape oil paintings of Waterhead Creek and a view of the Dart Estuary from Mount Boone. During the previous spring of 1921, Pissarro also visit- ed and painted scenes of the Devon countryside at Blackpool Vale. His paint- ings of Dartmouth and Blackpool are considered among his best.


Picture above -The Dart from Weeke’s Hill – Lucien Pissarro (1863-1944) Manchester Art Gallery).


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