search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
130


mammals and predators like the Barn Owl. The hawthorn trees here


are entwined with the slender tendrils of honeysuckle. Its exquisitely scented yellow-white flowers attract moths during the night and bumble bees during the day to feed on their nectar and pollinate the plants. The stretch of coast between


East Prawle and Lannacombe is fabulously rich in wildflowers. The best time to catch it in bloom is in spring and early summer, before the bracken grows up and takes over later in the season. Bluebells grow here in the


spring. So much associated with woodland, they make a striking sight out on the open cliffs. Spring also brings the bright yellow lesser celandine, primroses, and delicate violets with their rosettes of heart- shaped leaves. Red Campion, the white blooms


of Stitchwort in sprays on slender stems, and masses of Foxgloves, all flowers alongside the coast path. Sea Campion, growing in clusters, has white, open flowers with a small bladder- like sac behind each bloom, and a mat of small bluish leaves. The glossy, leafy alexanders, with its massed ‘umbels’ of tiny yellowish- green florets, loves the coastal climate in these parts and you will find patches of here and there all along the route. Down at Lannacombe, tree


mallow grows along the grassy edge behind the beach. This tall,


Cirl bunting Alexanders Tree mallow


woody-stemmed plant has large velvety leaves that are lovely to the touch and vivid pink- purple flowers with dark veins on the petals. Common lizards sometimes can be seen on the coast path, basking in the sun. Usually around 10 to 16cm long, these lizards feed on insects, spiders and snails. They are able to shed their tails if threatened by predators. Peregrine falcons breed along


this stretch of the coast and can often be seen perched up on the one of the craggy rock pinnacles or gliding along the cliffs. Peregrines have a whitish underside, yellow legs, and grey upper wings. They mainly hunt other birds, often catching them in incredibly fast stooping dives. There is a chance you might glimpse the nationally rare cirl bunting as you pass through the fields beyond Maelcombe House. This beautiful little bird has green and yellow stripes through the face, head and throat, and greenish- yellow plumage with rusty red patches. The cirl bunting relies on


Common lizard


traditional mixed farming practises which provide plenty of weed and grain seeds along with a rich mix of insects, especially grasshoppers. This kind of farming has been dying out over recent years but the land in this area is managed with its interests firmly in mind. The cirl bunting now only breeds here in South Devon.


Peregrine falcon


© Hugh-Venables / geograph-5388508


© Philip-Halling/geograph-1520003


©-Derek-Harper./geograph-5017227


© Rod-Allday/geograph-1933926-


©sylvia-duckworth geograph-872939


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164