search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
123


fight off that cold. Don’t shortchange yourself on sleep and then moan about poor attention spans and dropping off in meetings. Do take responsibility for yourself and your health.


Start by ditching all the short cuts you have become more than accustomed to. Do buy all your foods ‘loose’ and you will soon lose


that extra five pounds, along with reducing your intake of hidden sugars, fats and salts. If you make all your meals from start to finish the only person hiding any ingredients will be you. Loose foods are easy to spot – they are the ones not in


tetra pack trays with or without cardboard sleeves. Put the plastic down. Help yourself and help the environment. (See, ahead of the curve yet again with the rush not to have packaging becoming a world wide passion.)


7A simple amount of upkeep will behove us later in life:


Some of the most important organs after your heart are your bones. Did you know that bones are counted as rigid organs? Ones that move, support and protect your other organs. Your femur is the biggest of the 206 bones in your body. Bones are alive, they grow and change all the time


until you reach about 25 then they stop grow- ing larger. You will have all met someone who has shrunk, with age, in a shocking manner – don’t let that be you. Bones are in a constant cycle called


remodelling, with the construction of new bone occurring as the old bone breaks down to be reabsorbed into the body. The bones not only act as your support system, the skeleton, but also as a storage facility for minerals. When other body tissues require these minerals, the bones can provide them. You need to build bones by exercis-


ing. Any load bearing exercise will do. Take the stairs and avoid the lift. Lift weights (they don’t have to be heavy ones!) in the gym. Danc- ing, playing tennis or just plain old brisk walking will suffice. About 30 minutes a day of this kind of exercise will do you the world of good and keep you standing tall.


As we age bones become brittle and can snap like a


twig, with the accompanying noise. If you break a bone later in life the healing time is increased and the break may not mend neatly. Calcium is a bone’s best friend and is found in nuts,


broccoli and dairy products such as yoghurt and cheese. Vitamin D works in conjunction with calcium to stop bones becoming thin or brittle or, as we age, fights osteoporosis so plenty of sunshine and time spent outdoors is essential. Bones are always important no matter what our age!


I met a friend (Ingrid) the other day and told her she looked amazing (which she did!) and she said ‘it’s now or never’. This made me think about how I was treating life.


8Seize the day


My conclusion was I had better get on the ‘now or never train’ and shape up. If we wait until everything is perfect to take action it will never happen. Endless dissatisfaction with ourselves means we slouch around in clothes pulled haphazardly from the wardrobe that are thrown on in bad temper because we hate our figures. We spent so much time trying to cover up our imagined flaws that there is no time left over to celebrate our good parts. It is never too late to start shaping up mentally and physically.


Be yourself and be the best that you can be. The people in the magazines only achieve that level by having a vast amount of support.


9Stop trying to live up to life and be happy. 10My top tip is to enjoy someone else’s standards.


Happiness shows in your face and the way you carry yourself. The most beautiful and healthy people like to laugh and see the colours in the wind!


Happy Trails, Readers, Happy Trails


Illustrations by Lisa Wyman


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164