search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
145 Garden design Back to the future? W


hen we think about garden design, we often see it as a new phenomenon


– distinctly English and probably originating with Capability Brown. In fact, its roots go much further back and the earliest designed gardens date from about 3,000 years ago in what is now Iran. This was a time when Bronze Age Britons were still living in huts and the idea of decorative gardening was non- existent. The Ancient Egyptians were keen gardeners and a luxury Egyptian residence would typically include a large rectangular pond planted with lotus, surrounded by flowers and successive rows of trees (see image above ). Walls or columns supported vines, completing the effect. The Islamic garden tradition began around 1,000


is something that you will recognise, not just in grand historic landscapes, but in everyday gardens – possibly even your own. Fast-forward to the 18th Century and


© British Museum An


enormous amount of


the English Landscape movement was at its height. The design principles were very different from the rigid geometric patterns of Islamic and Renaissance gardens. For every trend there is a counter-trend. Based on a romantic, idealised vision


inspiration can be found in looking at the design of historical gardens


years ago and comprises many of the layouts and influences that are seen in our gardens today. They were traditionally square or rectangular and divided into four, using water channels, which symbolised the four rivers of heaven. They were places of rest and reflection and designed for contemplation. The Taj Mahal gardens and the Alhambra are especially fine examples but the principle of strong geometric design with formal pools, fountains and rills


Above: Blenheim Palace Professional Landscape & Garden Design


Creative and beautiful designs for village, town and country gardens


Colette Charsley PG Dip OCGD t: 01548 581753 m: 07774 827799


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com


of landscape and nature and inspired by artists like Claude Lorraine and Nicholas Poussin, these gardens showed an appreciation of the wildness of nature. In reality of course, it was artfully arranged and cultivated with serpentine lakes, grassy meadows and trees transplanted, often at huge cost, to


create visual interest. If you


could hire a hermit to dwell in a picturesque corner of your estate, then so much the better. While recreating the Taj Mahal,


Alhambra or Blenheim Palace gardens might not be an option, an enormous amount of inspiration can be found in looking at the design of historical gardens. History is a great teacher and looking back can often help us move forward. When thinking about your garden, remember that modern design can – and often does - select appropriate features from the past – it just depends on how you put it all together.


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com t: 01548 581753 m: 07774 827799 Follow me on Twitter @ColetteCharsley


Above: Alhambra


by Colette Charsley


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164