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All Trace Minerals Are Not Created Equal


By Peter Stark, Global Director Product Development, Zinpro Corporation


Although the amount needed is measured in milligrams, essential trace minerals are a key component in many biochemical processes in the  and promote growth, development and healthy reproduction in livestock.


However, not all trace minerals are considered equal in their structure, absorption and performance


A key component of an organic trace mineral is stability, meaning it can withstand the low pH of the stomach and not dissociate. Antagonists can bond to the mineral, causing it to not be absorbed and instead be excreted by the animal. The antagonist can also block the trace mineral transporters located in the GI tract, preventing the trace mineral from being taken up into the enterocyte in the small intestine — meaning the trace mineral will not be absorbed into the blood stream and utilized by the tissues and cells.


Transporters are the key to effective mineral absorption


For a trace mineral to be absorbed into the enterocyte, it must pass through transporters in the GI tract.Among the transporters are metal ion transporters and amino acid transporters.


R = Side chain of a 1:1 amino acid metal complex


Different metabolism demonstrates a unique form of metal in circulation, resulting in increased performance


Zinpro has multiple peer-reviewed research studies demonstrating how Zinpro Performance Minerals are metabolized differently.


Zinpro Performance Minerals are excreted in the urine at a much slower rate than inorganic and low-quality organic trace minerals. This means that Zinpro Performance Minerals are in circulation longer — allowing time for the tissues and cells to utilize the trace minerals more effectively.


Proven research


Inorganic trace minerals are metal ions and therefore must use the metal ion transporter


Organic trace minerals, while bonded to a carbon- containing molecule such as methionine hydroxy analog (MHA), often dissociate in the low pH of the stomach to become an inorganic trace mineral, meaning the mineral must use the metal ion transporter. This causes the transporter to regulate the amount of trace minerals absorbed by the enterocyte.


Zinpro Performance Minerals® are the only trace minerals where the metal is structurally bonded to


Zinpro Performance Minerals are proven — in over 250 peer-reviewed research studies — to help maximize  production, birth, hatch and hoof/paw health quality.


Trace minerals are not created equal. Zinpro Performance Minerals are proven to help you maximize the genetic potential of your animals.


certain amino acids that allow the  soluble, stable and not affected by antagonists, and is uniquely absorbed through the amino acid transporters. Then, once Zinpro Performance Minerals are in circulation, they are metabolized differently than other metal sources.


To learn more, take the proven path at inpro.com/provenperformance


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