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Upon closer investigation, seven genera differed significantly in abundance between the two treatment groups, as observed with Anova statistical analysis (p<0.05). Further Anova analyses with Tukey-Kramer post-hoc tests revealed significant increases in the Roseburia, Ruminococcus torques, Eubacterium hallii, and Shuttleworthia genera in the SYF group when compared to controls (p<0.05).


Promising results These results were particularly promising, as R. torques is an active commensal, abundant in the intestinal microbiota of healthy animals. A study which anaerobically cultivated caecal content samples from laying hens at 12 weeks observed that 10% of recovered bacterial colonies belonged to R. torques. Ruminococcus sequences were also identified in broiler caecums at 42 days of age. This bacterial group has the potential to degrade and convert complex polysaccharides into valuable nutrients, thus broilers treated with SYF could have more efficient nutrient uptake. The intestinal bacteria E. hallii and Roseburia also utilise a wide spectrum of substrates, where acetate and lactate are metabolised into butyric and propionic acids. These metabolites positively impact intestinal microbiota balance and gut cell development, consequently improving host health. In addition to the aforementioned increases, birds in the SYF group also demonstrated significant decreases in the Erysipe- lotrichaceae family—linked to inflammation-related gastro- intestinal disorders and Eubacterium genus bacteria (p<0.05).


Enterobacteria were also significantly reduced (p=0.026), and reductions in pathogenic Escherichia-Shigella bacteria were observed. Several E. coli strains can cause damaging local and systemic infections which negatively impact bird health, thus their reduction should lead to improved bird performance.


Dietary solution with significant benefits Safmannan is already proven to produce consistent beneficial effects on poultry gut health by reducing pathogens and en- hancing natural defences. In vivo and in-field experiences have clearly demonstrated that birds fed with SYF are more resilient to pathogens and environmental stressors, and also exhibit enhanced performance with improved growth and egg production. In the study conducted by Imunova Análises Biológicas , SYF supplementation led to significant changes in the composi- tion of intestinal microbiota of broiler birds under controlled conditions. Not only was the microbiota more diverse in SYF-treated animals, but beneficial bacteria were significantly increased, with a corresponding significant decrease in path- ogenic species. When considered all together, studies on lay- ing hens and broilers provide concrete evidence that SYF modulates gut microbiota in poultry with a beneficial impact on animal health. Thus, SYF supplementation significantly im- proves overall animal health, enabling the industry to reduce the likelihood and subsequent cost of managing potential pathogenic outbreaks.


References available on request ▶ GUT HEALTH | DECEMBER 2020 13


Boosting benefi- cial bacteria while limiting pathogens is key to obtaining a balanced micro- biota. PHOTO: PHILEO


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