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Gut health improving proteins in spray-dried plasma


To reduce antibiotic use in animals, managing gut health is instrumental. As bioactive proteins in spray- dried plasma have a positive effect on gut health in young animals and reduce diarrhoea, the use of spray- dried plasma should be considered when working on improving gut health.


BY LOURENS HERES AND CARINE VAN VUURE, DARLING INGREDIENTS / SONAC R


educing antimicrobial use is a worldwide challenge for farmed animals. In all parts of the world, large ef- forts are being made to reduce the use. Good stock- manship and animal care is needed to limit the use


of antibiotics and to only use it prudently, whereas antibiotics were so easy to use, and effective. To reduce antibiotic use, all aspects of animal management must be carefully taken into consideration. Feeding, housing, health management and bi- osecurity, all of these have to be controlled. Intestinal problems and the consequences of poor gut health on the total health can be important causes of poor animal performance. Feeding management is critical to support the gut health, and with that decrease the use of antibiotics. Gut health management in young animals encompasses restricting protein contents, pro- viding proteins with good digestibility, feeding fibres and a correct balance of nutrients. This article delves into how spray- dried plasma powder (SDPP) can contribute to a better gut health, and therewith to the reduction of antimicrobial use.


What is spray-dried plasma? Spray-dried plasma is a highly digestible and palatable ingredient for young animal feed. The natural source is fresh blood of healthy slaughtered pig or cattle. The blood is treated with sophisticated methods in dedicated plants to guarantee its safety for use in young animals. SDPP contains all the plasma proteins of blood, whose functionality is conserved by the spray-drying process applied. The very short heating during spray-drying guarantees the inactivation of micro-organisms on the one hand and the preservation of the functional protein on the other hand.


Effects of SDPP Weaned piglets that are fed diets containing SDPP show


10 ▶ GUT HEALTH | DECEMBER 2020


performance improvement, according to many studies during the last three decades. In general, an improvement in feed intake and weight gain is observed in weaned piglets. In chickens the improvement of feed efficiency dominates. Other studies proved that SDPP is an alternative for preventive use of antibiotics. Recent trials examined whether a high dose of zinc could be replaced by plasma. ZnO is a frequently used additive to prevent weaning diarrhoea and improve performance. The studies confirmed that, especially with higher and continued inclusion of SDPP, similar performance results for feed intake and growth could be achieved compared to the groups were zinc was included in the diet.


Besides improved performance and less diarrhoea, there is a down regulation of pro-inflammatory and an up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In vitro studies on pig entero- cytes showed differential gene up-regulation of tight junc- tion proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokine pathways.


Improving gut health in young animals SDPP encompasses different characteristics that are helpful for the gut health, and that are interrelated. It is hard to de- fine exactly what the relative importance of these factors is. Firstly, piglets like the taste of plasma, which links to the higher


PHOTO’S: DARLING INGREDIENTS


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