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Boosting beneficial microbial diversity in poultry


Selected yeast fraction is well known to improve the gut morphology, reduce pathogen pressure, and enhance the immune system of poultry. A new study has investigated whether this solution can also modulate intestinal microbiota.


BY DR ALAIN RIGGI, GLOBAL SPECIES MANAGER, POULTRY & DR TADELE KIROS, R&D MANAGER AT PHILEO BY LESAFFRE


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healthy functioning intestine is heavily reliant on a balanced gut microbiota, which is essential for the metabolism and absorption of consumed nutri- ents and other compounds. A flourishing microbi-


ota is characterised by diverse microbial genera which in- creases intestinal metabolic capacity. Population dynamics of the intestinal microbiota can be altered according to age, nu- trition, stress, bacterial infectious diseases, probiotics, and an- timicrobials, all of which can affect animal health and perfor- mance. Probiotics are effective moderators of the symbiotic relationship between the host and its gastrointestinal tract microbiota, and one recent study demonstrated that yeast probiotic modified piglet microbiota and enhanced animal growth. Safmannan is a premium selected yeast fraction (SYF) rich in mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS) and ß-glucans (1,3 and 1,6) and is obtained from the primary culture and


Figure 1 - SYF promotes poultry microbiota diversity (Principal component analysis (PCA)).


Control Safmannan


purification of selected proprietary S. cerevisiae strain (Phileo by Lesaffre). Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies worldwide have consistently demonstrated the positive effects of SYF on pathogen pressure reduction, gut integrity preservation, and immunity enhancement.


0.0 –0.1 –0.1 0.0 0.1 PC1 (44.5%) 12 ▶ GUT HEALTH | DECEMBER 2020 0.2


Comprehensive studies During a 2015 in vivo study conducted at Shandong Agricul- tural University, China, layers were subjected to a density challenge (333 cm²/hen) and were fed with 250 g/t SYF from 12 until 29 weeks of age. SYF maintained a healthy balanced gut microflora by binding to and decreasing harmful E.coli populations while concomitantly increasing beneficial Lacto- bacillus populations (Shandong Agricultural University, 2015). Within this same study, it was found that SYF also improved gut morphology and integrity by maintaining villi height and reducing crypt depth due to decreased gut inflammation. Thus with the simple addition of this postbiotic, animals are likely to absorb nutrients more readily and have greater re- sistance to challenging environmental conditions (Shandong Agricultural University, 2015). To investigate whether SYF could also modulate the microbi- ome of broilers, a recent in vivo trial was undertaken by Imu- nova Análises Biológicas in Brazil. Using cutting-edge metagenomic next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques, they examined whether supplementing feed with SYF could improve microbial diversity and benefit the animals. These NGS methods generate vast quantities of data on the mi- crobes comprising the gut microflora, and also enable the identification of novel bacterial genera that were previously undetectable with classical microbiology techniques. For this study, one-day-old Cobb 500 chickens were obtained from a commercial hatchery and divided into two treatment groups with 30 birds per pen and 8 pens per treatment. Chickens underwent feed restriction for the first 34 hours, and were then fed ad lib for 28 days with a wheat and bar- ley-based diet supplemented with or without 250 g/t SYF. Faeces samples were collected for DNA extraction and analy- sis at D21. The resulting data was taxonomically classified to identify bacteria, and relative bacterial proportions were es- tablished. It was found that SYF was responsible for 44.5% of differences in mean microbial proportions via bi-directional principle component analysis (Figure 1), indicating a more di- verse caecal microbiota.


PC2 (29.7%)


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