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of protein sources. This antibiotic-free line also benefits from advanced knowledge and analytical resources of feed com- ponents. As the piglet digestive tract is a maturing and chal- lenged system, it requires careful attention with proper raw materials qualification and selection. This also implies a con- stant quality control. For this purpose, the group leans on its internal laboratory. Over time, the CCPA group has gather a thorough knowledge on raw materials quality, on protein, en- ergy and dairy-based sources and about the different pro- cesses applied on raw materials. On top of that, extensive tri- als in its experimental farm support these findings. To better assess the impact of ingredients on piglet digestive physiolo- gy, specific laboratory analyses are used and translated in feed formulation criteria. In particular, the acid binding ca- pacity and cooking rate of starch sources are regularly ana- lysed to give precision in feed designs and optimisations.


Securing the digestive process Thanks to its research expertise in nutrition and health, CCPA has created a new feed solution to secure the piglet digestive process. Based on trials in its experimental farm and in commercial farms, the complete solution Immax combines plant extracts and a prebiotic source with three actions. The first mode of action sees the selected flavonoids sources (Scutellaria Baïcalensis, Curcuma and Green Tea extracts) acts as cellular protectors with positive effects on integrity of intestinal epithelial cells. This contributes to strengthen barrier function and helps nutrient absorption. “Now, weaned piglets also benefit from the properties of Scutellaria Baïcalensis, a natural solution patented by CCPA Group, after several years of proven use to protect mammary cells for milk-producing animals,” Vincent Bégos highlights. A second positive effect of the plant sources are their anti-se- cretory activities. The company has extensive knowledge of inducing anti-secretory factor by the inclusion of SPC Wheat, a specific raw material used in its creep and pre-starter feeds ranges. This factor limits water and ion losses from the gut and results in reducing the risk of diarrhoea. The selected plant extracts also have a similar capacity to inhibit the acti- vation of chloride channels of the gut mucosa and thus pre- vent high secretion of water in the lumen. Finally, the new solution interacts with gut microbiota, influ- encing proliferation of beneficial bacteria. The prebiotic effect of sodium gluconate gives the advantages to Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. This action is also positive for gut epithelium through increased acetic and butyric acids concentrations.


Support demedication in the farm “As our field trials have proven to us secured and high-grade antibiotic-free feeds will really deliver their full potential if used in optimal breeding conditions. A thorough and tailored assessment of the farm readiness for demedication is a key- point of success. To allow that, we have developed our expert


CCPA relies on a secured approach from the feed up to the farm.


app. Demeus,” states Anne-Sophie Valable, piglet nutritionist of CCPA Group. Demeus is a mobile application designed to support pig farm nutritionists to drive demedication strategies in post-weaning. Based on a quick and precise questionnaire focussing on key farm management features, the app quickly draws a clear picture of the farm situation, highlights the strengths and improvement leads. Then, it provides personalised advice on the adapted nutrition to maintain performance and health without in-feed antibiotics. In addition to the scientific literature and its field-savvy expe- rience, the tool is based on the CCPA Group participation in the European project ProHealth. The project’s aim was to syn- thesise strategies to reduce the impact of production diseas- es on farms and assess the efficacy of improvement strategies in reducing disease prevalence or severity. This work has highlighted the importance of specific farm management practices to succeed with non-medicated feed from six main key topics: external and internal biosecurity, sanitary status, housing management, water management and the farmer profile. Thanks to this work, a survey was built to assess the farm management. In addition, more than 30 European experts (nutritionists and veterinarians) working for feed manufacturers and national institutes were solicited on the relative importance of the questions for demedication success. And as a bonus for the nutritionist, an efficient and practical tool is available to ensure the success of antibiot- ic-free feeds thanks to optimal breeding conditions.


▶ GUT HEALTH | DECEMBER 2020 49


PHOTO: CCPA


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