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IN MY VIEW


Environmentally Friendly And Safe Pool Water – Thanks To UV


JAMES HADLEY, UK SALES MANAGER AT UV SPECIALIST HANOVIA HAS BEEN IN THE INDUSTRY FOR 5 YEARS. AN ENGINEERING AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT GRADUATE, JAMES IS A MEMBER OF ISPE AND WILL BE INVOLVED IN THE FORTHCOMING PWTAG INDUSTRY FORUMS. HERE HE EXPLAINS THE BENEFITS OF UV TECHNOLOGY AND GIVES SOME INSIGHTS INTO ITS USE IN THE WET LEISURE SECTOR


T


he benefits of UV technology for the leisure industry are ensuring that the pool users are safe and comfortable in the pool, while maintaining all the regulations for pool water quality at all times. Installing UV technology is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly way to provide the pool users with healthy and hygienic water, while at the same time controlling costs by reducing the use of chlorine and the need to dilute and back wash the pool water. UV technology also creates no hazardous by-products, which reduces the corrosion of steel structures therefore minimising maintenance costs, as well as helping to avoid repair and maintenance on the pool from chemical wear.


Q?: In the UK what areas of the leisure industry are adopting UV technology more than others?


From our experience public pools, hydrotherapy pools and spas are now regularly using UV technology because of the benefits associated with UV. Small pools in private houses and small hotels often don’t think they can justify the installation of UV, but it is now becoming more common every year. School pools are really beginning to show an increase in the use of UV technology because of the benefits UV brings in regard to water quality and reduced running and maintenance costs. Hotels are also realising the benefit of UV, with one of the major benefits being no odours from the pool water, that may spread to other areas of the hotel, as well as crystal clear water and maintaining the highest standards of hygiene and water quality.


Q?: How does UV use vary across the world? Which countries are advocates and which are not?


UV is used globally for municipal, industrial and domestic water treatment, but its use for pool water treatment varies from region to region. The countries that most strongly advocate its use are the USA and the UK. Within Western Europe, there is widespread


88 October 2013 SPN


result more and more pool operators – from public pools to hotel spas – are installing UV systems. Not only does UV produce water of an excellent, crystal clear nature, it also provides savings on chemicals. Facilities are being improved around the country, down to various sporting events around the UK and globe that have influenced the general public and increased the demand. In general the UK public is getting fitter and taking part in more leisure activities like swimming, leisure centres, spa and hotel operators are looking to improve their facilities. The government is also pushing for get fit schemes through various groups to lower the level of obesity in the country. This year already we have seen an increase in enquiries to Hanovia from the leisure industry and looking at signs of the economy recovering, we believe the UV market in general is set to grow further.


use, but some peculiarities exist from country to country. The French authorities, for example, recognise the ability of UV to break down chloramines and UV is widely used in pools in France for this purpose. However, France does not allow the use of UV as a disinfectant and this is not because UV is not a highly effective disinfectant, but because there is no residual effect – one needs a residual chemical (usually chlorine) in addition. This ruling is ironic, because the world’s first large-scale municipal water plant using UV disinfection was built in Marseilles in 1910. The French authorities are probably concerned that pool builders will install UV without providing for residual chemical dosing. Thus UV systems sold in France for aquatic applications must be described as ‘dechloraminateurs’, which needs no translation. UV systems for pools must also have prior approval from the French Ministry of Health.


Q?: Can you sum up of how UV is looked at now by the industry and will be in the future? Industry standards are getting more stringent and there is wider industry understanding of UV science and recognise the real benefits of UV. The Pool Water Treatment Advisory Group (PWTAG) now backs the use of UV and as a


Q?: What is there to look forward to with regards to Hanovia products? Hanovia’s SwimLine UV system was designed specifically for the pool industry – it’s not just a standard off the shelf product that is adapted to pool applications. Since a Hanovia SwimLine system was introduced in AC Baths in New Zealand, the pool operator has noticed “reduced running costs and reduced maintenance. Also, the regular replacement of fresh water, commonly required with a standard, chlorine-based treatment regime, is much reduced. We see this as a positive improvement, not just environmentally but also as a cost saving exercise.” Hanovia is at the forefront of UV science and works closely with key governing bodies and institutes, such as the PWTAG, to improve water quality constantly and meet the needs of tomorrow’s industry. To keep up to date with Hanovia why not follow the company on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn? The company’s website is also packed with lots of useful information.


Hanovia 01753 515300 www.hanovia.com


www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk


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