This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ALLERGY FREE


Allergy Free Swimming


WHILE GOVERNING BODIES TRY TO SORT OUT CRITERIA FOR TESTING CHLORINE ALTERNATIVES, THE NUMBER OF PRODUCTS CLAIMING TO PROVIDE AN ALLERGY FREE SWIMMING EXPERIENCE GROWS. IT’S A SECTOR DRIVEN IN PART BY THE DEMAND FROM SOMETIMES ILL INFORMED CONSUMERS TO FIND AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE PERCEIVED ‘BAD OLD CHLORINE’. THE CHLORINE VERSUS NON OR LOW CHLORINE DEBATE IS ONE THAT’S SET TO RUN AND REMAINS A DELICATE AND A CONTROVERSIAL ONE THOUGH By JonWadeson


D


oes exposure to swimming pool chemicals, particularly chlorine, result in increased allergy problems for swimmers or increased instances


of asthma? To date, there have been many studies and reports, some claim that there is a clear link between chlorine, or to be specific, the by-products created from its use, and respiratory issues with some swimmers, yet other studies either contradict their findings or are at best inconclusive. There is no denying that skin and eye irritation complaints exist and are common but again the results of studies always seem to vary. It does though appear that people with a predisposition to ‘allergies’ are more likely to suffer as a result of being exposed to pools with chlorine but, (and it is a big but), the message is still a mixed one. The danger is that chlorine gets labelled as being a problem chemical, which to a degree is understandable, however when used properly and carefully it remains an effective deterrent against pool water infection and without it, there is a much higher risk associated with using pools.


The problem isn’t the chlorine, but what chlorine turns into when combined with


72 October 2013 SPN


organics. The organics are contributed by bathers in the pool in the form of sweat, dander, urine and other organics. The chlorine reacts with the organics and produces nitrogen trichloride, aldehydes, halogenated hydrocarbons, chloroform, trihalomethanes and chloramines. The view about the asthma research remains sceptical and the advice of PWTAG (Pool Water Treatment Advisory Group) is that with so called ‘alternative treatments’, a residual oxidising disinfectant should always be present in the water as well. With so many mixed messages out there, one thing that is definite though is that when it comes to allergies, the finger has and is still being pointed firmly at the use of chlorine in swimming pools and that is something that is unlikely to go away. Ongoing research throughout the world and particularly in Europe, is set to increase and the information will allow pool owners to make a better qualified decision for the treatment of their pools.


Already though, domestic and commercial swimming pool owners and managers face a choice of standard chlorine based products


or a growing range of low and no chlorine options plus chemical free products, some of which are considered to offer a similar standard of water quality. With the ‘bad press’ chlorine has had regarding allergies, these alternatives have become increasingly tempting for many pool owners and operators.


THE UV GENERATION


Ultraviolet disinfection is now an established method of water treatment for commercial pools and has become the preferred treatment choice for a number of leading international leisure brands and new-build or renovated swimming pools. It’s important to be clear though that ultra- violet generation (UV) is not an alternative to chlorine. In terms of minimising chlorine use UV can reduce the amount of free chlorine that is measured in a typical pool by up to 50%, but since UV has no residual effect outside the UV chamber in the plant room the pool requires an additional residual disinfectant to minimise cross infection between bathers.


Photo-oxidisation through UV generation reduces the amount of dilution required


www.swimmingpoolnews.co.uk


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92