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LOT 290 1976 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow


SPECIFICATION Registration


Chassis No. Engine No.


Odometer Reading Estimate


RGN 909P SRH24882 24882 34,595


£14,000 - £18,000 The Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was a luxury saloon car built


from 1965 through to 1980 and was the first Rolls-Royce to be constructed using a monocoque chassis and, to date, has the largest production volume of any Rolls-Royce. The original Shadow was 3½ inches narrower and seven inches shorter than its predecessor, the Silver Cloud, but managed to offer increased passenger and luggage space thanks to more efficient packaging. Aside from a more modern appearance and construction, the Silver Shadow introduced many new features such as disc brakes replacing drum brakes and independent rear suspension rather


than the ageing live axle design of previous models. It featured a 189bhp 6.75litre V8 engine from 1970 onwards, mated to a Turbo Hydromantic 400 transmission supplied by General Motors. The superb ride quality achieved in the Shadow was thanks to the innovative high-pressure hydraulic system with dual-circuit braking and hydraulic self-levelling suspension. This Silver Shadow is in extremely good order in every aspect.


The low mileage of only 34,000 gives a clear impression of what to expect but only after viewing the car do you get a true indication as to how well she has been looked after. Taking into account that this car is 35 years old, the condition is truly impressive. The coachwork is virtually unmarked and the chromework, of which there is plenty on this model, as good as new. The walnut door cappings, together with the dashboard, are highly polished and unblemished, as is the leather interior. Supplied with a V5 Registration document, together with a valid MoT test certificate and good level of service history, this example represents a rare treat as prices appear to be rising substantially for these models in good condition.


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