This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LOT 277 1941 Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa


SPECIFICATION Registration


Chassis No. Engine No.


Odometer Reading Estimate


G-CGRM/P8088/NK-K CBAF 534 n/a n/a


£120,000 - £150,000


The Spitfire is the most famous British fighter aircraft in history. It became a symbol of freedom during the summer months of 1940 by helping to defeat the German air attacks during the Battle of Britain. It was the highest performing Allied aircraft in 1940. The immortal R.J. Mitchell-designed Vickers-Supermarine Spitfire fighter evolved from the world air speed record-setting, Schneider Trophy race- winning, Supermarine seaplanes of the 1920s and early 1930s. The crowds at the 1936 RAF Display at Hendon had a first glimpse of the prototype Spitfire but it was not until August 1938 that production Spitfires began to enter service. By the outbreak of war, a year later, nine squadrons were equipped. In spite of vigorous demands from France, the Commander in Chief of Fighter Command refused to send any Spitfires to France during the German Blitzkrieg of 1940. The wisdom of that decision was clearly shown. By July 1940 RAF Fighter Command had nineteen Spitfire squadrons available. Once the RAF modified their tactics to properly counter the Luftwaffe, the Spitfire proved to be the only British fighter capable of meeting the Messerschmitt Bf109E on equal terms. Often the outcome of a combat depended more on the quality of the pilot than his aircraft. The 1940 Battle of Britain Spitfire Mk. II was powered by a 1,240hp Rolls-Royce Merlin Mk. XII engine, providing a top speed of some


www.historics.co.uk


354mph at 17,550ft plus the ability to climb at a rate of 3,025ft per minute. The Spitfire has since become woven into the fabric of world history as an icon of its age. This particular Mk. IIa Spitfire was donated in January 1941 by the


Borough of Lambeth Spitfire Fund. The name Borough of Lambeth was given after the group who had raised funds in ‘The Walks Own Spitfire Fund’. There was talk that it would be called the Lambeth Walk after the popular song of the same name but authority won with the more austere name ‘Borough of Lambeth’. This aircraft was manufactured at the Castle Bromwich Aeroplane Factory (number 523) in February 1941 and dispatched for service, being taken on charge with 39 Maintenance Unit, Colerne on 1st March 1941 with serial number P8088. From Colerne, P8088 was delivered for active service on 21st March 1941 to 66 Squadron, Exeter. On the 9th April, 1941, P8088 was then stationed at 118 Squadron, Ibsley,


121


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156